Cyclists

There is a law already for those M roads you mentioned, they are motorways and cyclists are not allowed on them.

It seems a shame that the common sense of one's own self safety comes second to egos and likes by the likes of the chicken man.
So you're saying that the only legal way to drive between Cork and Dublin is via the motorway?

I don't think that's true.

Or you didn't understand my point. One or the other.
 
As you mention Capwell Bus Station driving down Summerhill South tonight a cyclist in cycle lane and scooter isn’t behind also in cycle lane - just as I’m about to pass them, the scooter isn’t without looking pulled out into traffic lane, overtook slower moving cyclist, and then pulled back into cycle lane. Lucky I was alert enough to expect the unexpected.
i find these e scooters very unsetteling on the roads and in the cycle lanes.. they are neither here or there like, they are to fast to be in cycle lanes really and to slow to be on the main roads with cars...i dont see mirrors on many of them..i have had a mirror on my bike for donkeys years, they are essential while cycling in the city.
 
So you're saying that the only legal way to drive between Cork and Dublin is via the motorway?

I don't think that's true.

Or you didn't understand my point. One or the other.
Sorry did I say it wrong 🤔 ?

Cycling is not allowed on a Motorway.

If one is driving a normal road vehicle then they can drive on any of the roads between Cork & Dublin.
 
Sorry did I say it wrong 🤔 ?

Cycling is not allowed on a Motorway.

If one is driving a normal road vehicle then they can drive on any of the roads between Cork & Dublin.
I'm saying that using your logic for drivers, drivers should be forced to use the infrastructure provided, whether or not it's appropriate.
It's the equivalent of forcing drivers going from bishopstown to wilton to use the South Ring Road.
There are very good reasons not to use that route, even though in theory it makes more sense...
 
I'm saying that using your logic for drivers, drivers should be forced to use the infrastructure provided, whether or not it's appropriate.
It's the equivalent of forcing drivers going from bishopstown to wilton to use the South Ring Road.
There are very good reasons not to use that route, even though in theory it makes more sense...
Well those motor vehicle drivers have to pay motor tax in order to use their vehicles on public roads.
Cyclists don't have to pay this tax.

Therefore the motor vehicle drivers have a choice and the majority will chose the shortest / quickest route.
 
Well those motor vehicle drivers have to pay motor tax in order to use their vehicles on public roads.
Cyclists don't have to pay this tax.

Therefore the motor vehicle drivers have a choice and the majority will chose the shortest / quickest route.
And that attitude is why Ireland is so very, very car centered, to the detriment of Ireland's health, wealth, environment and society.
 

Catherine Conlon: The needs of citizens must take priority over those of motorists​

We need to begin reimagining streets as a liveable, breathable, social space and not another car alley.

More than 750 motorists were detected speeding on Irish roads on the Road Safety Authority (RSA) National Slowdown Day last week despite skyrocketing road deaths this year.

The mindset of many drivers to their absolute right to dominate the road space in towns, cities, and rural roads continues.

Jason van der Velde, a prehospital emergency medicine and critical care retrieval physician at Cork University Hospital, suggested that the distraction caused by our addiction to phones and the large digital display screens in modern cars is also a key issue in road deaths and that mobile phone use while driving must become socially unacceptable. Dr van der Velde reports how he has arrived at the scene of fatal road traffic accidents to find victims holding a phone.

"You can throw as much legislation at this as you’d like but until it’s socially unacceptable to interact with somebody on a phone while you’re driving it will not change," he said.

As motorists were reported to be clocking up to 194km/h on one road near Castlemartyr in East Cork and another doing 112 km/h on the main street in North Cork, while keeping an eye on their mobile phones, what is being given sparse attention is the impact that the predominance of motorised transport on streets and roads has on the ability of everyone else to move around.

The perception that the motorist has absolute priority on the roads is one that has grown over decades since car ownership has become ubiquitous.

The RSA perpetuates this widely-held perception. In its leaflet offering safety advice to parents when walking their children to school, the RSA states that "research shows that children under 12 should not cross roads on their own. They cannot decide how far away a car is or how fast it is going". Really? Does this mean that children who are in their 12th year cannot leave their house to visit their friends or run around to the local shop for milk or bread? Or even walk to school on their own?

Dublin Cycling Campaign in a widely circulated translation of the leaflet suggests that this advice should be rewritten to place the onus on drivers where, they suggest, it belongs.

"Research shows that adults should not operate motor vehicles if they cannot avoid knocking down children."
Instead of RSA advice for children to wear high visibility clothing when out walking, the advice could be "motorists should focus on the road ahead and not be distracted by their mobile phone".

Instead of advising that parents assess their child’s understanding by asking them to bring you across the road, the advice could be "after some weeks, ask your children how much they enjoy walking or cycling to school". The suggestion being made by the Dublin Cycling Campaign is for the RSA leaflet to be reshaped to support the rights of children to independent active movement in their own community.

This ability for children and young teens to be able to move freely and independently around their towns and cities has never been more vital — something that we consistently underestimate.

Social psychologist Johnathan Haidt in his new book, The Anxious Generation, describes the well-intentioned but disastrous shift towards overprotecting children and restricting their autonomy in the real world that began in the late 1980s.

"Children need a great deal of free play to thrive. The small scale challenges and setbacks that happen during play are like an inoculation that prepares children to face much larger challenges later Unsupervised play declined at the same time that the personal computer became more common and more inviting as a space for spending more free time."
Who doesn’t remember spending hours in the local park with a book, playing rounders, climbing trees, or roller-skating up and down your street with local kids, completely unsupervised by parents or carers? Where have those days gone?

That freedom was lost with the predominance of cars that literally shoved kids, and everyone else, off roads as they clogged up streets and rat-raced through estates to chop a few seconds off travel times.
https://form.jotform.com/2009138433...om/opinion/commentanalysis/arid-41379523.html
As Cork city enters a critical phase over the next two decades, with a population that will grow by 50% to 60%, there are plans to build a transformative metropolitan transport system, housing, ambitious cycling and walking infrastructure and significant urban renewal.

How that change is managed and received by Cork citizens will influence both economic development and quality of life for all those who live, work, socialise, sleep, and play in the city.
It is an exciting time and one that warrants massive ambition in ensuring that the needs of all its citizens, young and old alike, are centrally positioned at the very heart of that vision.

 
A female cyclist has died following a road traffic incident involving a truck in Dún Laoghaire, Co Dublin, on Wednesday morning.

Gardaí and emergency services attended the scene of the crash at the junction of the Glenageary Road Upper, Mountown Road Lower and Kill Avenue in Dún Laoghaire.

The incident involving the truck and bicycle occurred at about 8am on Wednesday morning, according to a statement from gardaí.

“The cyclist, a woman in her 20s, was taken to St Vincent’s Hospital where she later passed away from her injuries,” An Garda Síochána said in a statement.
Rest In Peace to the poor young woman.
 
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