The train to Youghal/Waterford

What to use a railway line that was completely closed since the 1930s which had no hope of ever opening again and was narrow gauge not Irish broad gauge ? The youghal line is a line which has had a significant part of it repoened and it's connected to the national network. Also the blackrock line wasnt converted to a greenway until the 1980s. So I ask how can you use the blackrock passage line as a precedent for the Youghal line ?

The old Blackrock route is identified for a bus rapid transit corridor which will connect Mahon, Docklands, city centre, UCC, Wilton, CIT and Ballincollig. That proposal is infinitely more viable than any reopening of a rail link to Youghal.

The precedent is in the principle of a greenway going on a old rail line and then a proposal coming along for that greenway to be redeveloped again as a public transport corridor.
 
The old Blackrock route is identified for a bus rapid transit corridor which will connect Mahon, Docklands, city centre, UCC, Wilton, CIT and Ballincollig. That proposal is infinitely more viable than any reopening of a rail link to Youghal.

The precedent is in the principle of a greenway going on a old rail line and then a proposal coming along for that greenway to be redeveloped again as a public transport corridor.

Dodgy stuff going on there at night time.

Be wide
 
Any chance they would build a new train station in the Carrigtwohill IDA? Word on the street is that 2 businesses in this IDA are building on. A train from the city/Midleton would be a great asset. The current train station in Carrigtwohill is half hour walk from the IDA. Makes no sense as the train track actually passes right through the IDA.

Was planned but went bang. Even if it was there would many people use it? The train is far too infrequent (1 per hour each direction outside of peak hours) and many people working on the IDA don't do 9-5. Doubt too many would leave the car at home with such an infrequent service.

As for the Youghal line reopening. Not going to happen. Not enough demand and the massive cost would never stand up to a cost benefit analysis. The Midleton reopening cost €75m in 2009 for 10km, so around €7.5m per km. The 25km from Midleton to Youghal would be ballpark €190m. Non-runner.
 
Was planned but went bang. Even if it was there would many people use it? The train is far too infrequent (1 per hour each direction outside of peak hours) and many people working on the IDA don't do 9-5. Doubt too many would leave the car at home with such an infrequent service.

As for the Youghal line reopening. Not going to happen. Not enough demand and the massive cost would never stand up to a cost benefit analysis. The Midleton reopening cost €75m in 2009 for 10km, so around €7.5m per km. The 25km from Midleton to Youghal would be ballpark €190m. Non-runner.

Good post/points
 
As we're frequently told, trains and buses exist to meet a social need, not to turn profits.

Same as delivering a letter or the post office network.

That's why pay tax, for public services.
 
As for the Youghal line reopening. Not going to happen. Not enough demand and the massive cost would never stand up to a cost benefit analysis. The Midleton reopening cost €75m in 2009 for 10km, so around €7.5m per km. The 25km from Midleton to Youghal would be ballpark €190m. Non-runner.

The cost of the Dublin-Navan extension of 34km was estimated to cost between 64mill and 90mill
 
The cost of the Dublin-Navan extension of 34km was estimated to cost between 64mill and 90mill

The €64m estimate was from Rail Users Ireland lobby group who notoriously underestimate infrastructure costs. The €90m was an estimate from c.2005 from Transport 21. Construction inflation since then would make that figure completely unrealistic. But even if you could do it for say €100m (remember the 10km from Glounthaune took €75m) it's still unjustifiably expensive for the relative little gain. How many people living in Youghal actually commute to Cork AND would be willing to dump the car for the train? Not many I'd wager. We should encouraging people to live closer to Cork city and improving the transit in and around the city, not repeating the Dublin mistakes of massive commutes to towns 40km+ from the city.
 
As we're frequently told, trains and buses exist to meet a social need, not to turn profits.

Same as delivering a letter or the post office network.

That's why pay tax, for public services.

This is why public transport in Ireland gets a state subsidy via the taxpayer.

Irish Rail have already come out and state and that there is no sustainable model or sufficient demand for a rail service to Youghal and the state would rather spend money on other much needed public services than another failed western rail corridor type deal.
 
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