Plans to extend Cork City boundary

Who's moaning?

This fella, seems he has to actually work with some colleague in the County, fuck that makes 2 of them having to work, must be terrible for them.

The man in charge of getting Cork City Council ready is David Joyce, who’s been appointed as transition director.

He told TheJournal.ie that there’s an awful lot of work to be done.

Joyce said: “We have no idea how many social housing units are in the expanded area. We don’t know how many parks, car parks, parking space, kilometres of road, public lighting… this is all information we don’t have at this point in time.

It’s hard for us to understand at the minute how much we’ll have to change. We’re trying to understand it on a service by service basis what [the county council] provides in terms of both people and finance.

Joyce said he was working closely with his counterpart in the county council to try to understand these things in advance of next year’s May/June deadline.
 
If economic rather than political factors were decisive, Cork's functional urban region would extend to encompass the commuting zones of Cork city based on OECD definitions. The harbour area, where much of the employment of the city region is located, has been left out. Census commuting patterns indicate that people are predominantly travelling from Douglas, Ballincollig, Glanmire, Midleton, Passage, Rochestown and Carrigaline to workplaces in the Harbour, Little Island and the city centre on a daily basis.

But Carrigaline, Glanmire, Midleton, Passage, parts of Rochestown and other harbour areas have been excluded in the new boundary proposal. The result of this will be that the city will not be managing services in all the residential and development areas of the greater city-region.

In addition, the new boundary includes land on the opposite side of the city, which is currently rural (near Blarney and Tower), and this area does not contain much employment. Directing the city in a north-west direction away from the majority of work opportunities on the east and south side of the city makes no sense. Again it increases sprawl, resulting in segregated suburb-to-suburb living and working connections, the spreading of public services, and even more car dependency. The proposed boundary for appropriate governance of the Cork-city region is wrong and if it goes ahead Cork city's struggle for prosperity will be undermined for the foreseeable future.
 
If economic rather than political factors were decisive, Cork's functional urban region would extend to encompass the commuting zones of Cork city based on OECD definitions. The harbour area, where much of the employment of the city region is located, has been left out. Census commuting patterns indicate that people are predominantly travelling from Douglas, Ballincollig, Glanmire, Midleton, Passage, Rochestown and Carrigaline to workplaces in the Harbour, Little Island and the city centre on a daily basis.

But Carrigaline, Glanmire, Midleton, Passage, parts of Rochestown and other harbour areas have been excluded in the new boundary proposal. The result of this will be that the city will not be managing services in all the residential and development areas of the greater city-region.

In addition, the new boundary includes land on the opposite side of the city, which is currently rural (near Blarney and Tower), and this area does not contain much employment. Directing the city in a north-west direction away from the majority of work opportunities on the east and south side of the city makes no sense. Again it increases sprawl, resulting in segregated suburb-to-suburb living and working connections, the spreading of public services, and even more car dependency. The proposed boundary for appropriate governance of the Cork-city region is wrong and if it goes ahead Cork city's struggle for prosperity will be undermined for the foreseeable future.

Forget Little Island and Ringaskiddy, the County Council need them for their precious, precious rents and will not relent on that under any circumstances. Look at the language that was used; "West Cork's Brexit" "A land grab" you'd swear that it was international borders being discussed, rather than local government administrative area's. A sensible discussion on the actual borders of Cork City defined by economic activity, population centers and commuting patterns was never on the table. It was about getting to County to agree to as much as possible.
 
I think the idea is to gently arrest the sprawl to the south and east that has occurred over the last 40+ years and to encourage expansion to the north and east redressing the balance around the city centre.

Yes the heavy goods shipping is dictated by the geography of the river, and the location of the airport compounded the southern drift but the rail, roadway to the rest of the country, and majority of space free for expansion now, is to the north and west.
 
If economic rather than political factors were decisive, Cork's functional urban region would extend to encompass the commuting zones of Cork city based on OECD definitions. The harbour area, where much of the employment of the city region is located, has been left out. Census commuting patterns indicate that people are predominantly travelling from Douglas, Ballincollig, Glanmire, Midleton, Passage, Rochestown and Carrigaline to workplaces in the Harbour, Little Island and the city centre on a daily basis.

But Carrigaline, Glanmire, Midleton, Passage, parts of Rochestown and other harbour areas have been excluded in the new boundary proposal. The result of this will be that the city will not be managing services in all the residential and development areas of the greater city-region.

In addition, the new boundary includes land on the opposite side of the city, which is currently rural (near Blarney and Tower), and this area does not contain much employment. Directing the city in a north-west direction away from the majority of work opportunities on the east and south side of the city makes no sense. Again it increases sprawl, resulting in segregated suburb-to-suburb living and working connections, the spreading of public services, and even more car dependency. The proposed boundary for appropriate governance of the Cork-city region is wrong and if it goes ahead Cork city's struggle for prosperity will be undermined for the foreseeable future.

OECD definitions mean nothing to the bog trotting County Council officials who's only interest as has been demonstrated in their protestations regarding the extended City boundary, is solely down to rates and to the amount of revenue they were going to be giving up.
 
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