New docklands development

Personal Jaysus

Full Member
The plans for the Odlums building are truly horrific. The architect responsible wants a good funt up the hole.

iu




2755407_7_articleinlinemobile_south_20docks_202_1_.jpg



R&H Hall to be flattened too

"Unlike the Odlums building, there are major structural issues which make a viable re-purposing of the silo buildings impossible to achieve,” according to OCP.

🤣 Everytime someone puts in a planning application, you shit all over it.
 

Hank Scorpio

Full Member
259426079_126203726487523_3371095794230264591_n.jpg



1919 and 2019 - Cork Flour Mills.


By 1810 Cork had become a big market for flour especially with brewers and distillers. The milling trade has passed through a complete revolution in the process of manufacture during the last forty years. Up to the years 1875 to 1880 the only method of manufacturing flour was grinding by millstones, the wheat being ground between two flat circular stones.

Cork National Flour Mills: Between 1875 and 1880 Cork became one of the first milling centres in Ireland to adopt the roller process, and a number of well-equipped mills in the City and County were constructed, in which some 70,000 tons of wheat was milled annually, and in addition, close on 90,000 tons of maize was ground. A large and landmark mill and warehouse complex known as the Cork National Flour Mills on Cork’s South Docks was built in 1892.
Cork Milling Company: By the time of the Irish Free State government, the Cork Milling Company was formed and took over the Cork National Flour Mills site. It was greatly influenced by the imposition of tariffs on foreign-milled flour, and the Government’s invitation to put up mills within the emerging Free State. The Cork Milling Company, Ltd. comprised John Furlong & Sons (1920) Ltd., Marina Mills, Cork, J. and R. Webb, Ltd., Mallow Mills, Mallow and Glandalane Mills, Fermoy; T. Hallinan & Sons (1932) Ltd, Avoncore Mills, Midleton; and J. W. MacMullen & Sons, Ltd., Cork.


New Offices: In September 1932, in order to accommodate adequately their staff, the Cork Milling Company opened new offices on Victoria Quay. The building was erected on an almost triangular site with two street frontages, and the main entrance was placed on the more important Victoria Road. Externally the building has modern tendencies which are accentuated by the shape of the site and the treatment of the first floor. Internally the ground floor was designed to accommodate a very large staff in the general office, which has a floor area of 1,700 sq. feet, with three directors’ rooms in addition.
New Plant: The work of preparing the plans for a building capable of housing a modern flour-milling plant was entrusted to the noted Cork architects, Messrs Chillingworth and Levie, and in September 1933 work began on the erection and completed in July 1934. The contractors for the building were Messrs. John Sisk and Son. According to the Cork Examiner, although there was an original building on the present site, the work entailed a large amount of engineering skill, and, thanks to the Consulting Engineer Mr J L O’Connell, the reusability of adapting the older premises as a mill, was accomplished. The original walls were supported on timber piles. These walls were raised considerably and the original floor area was doubled, and in order to ensure a thoroughly substantial job, a complete framework of steel was raised up within the main walls, each stanchion of which was supported by a concrete pile, the idea being to save the original fabric from damage by vibration.


New Grain Silo: In 1934, the Cork Examiner reported that the construction of a twelve thousand five hundred tons Grain Silo was finished at the Marina Mills, Victoria Quay for The Cork Milling Company.
The Company engaged the services of English engineer Mr William Littlejohn Philip, O.B.E., a consulting engineer, whose very extensive knowledge and experience in storing grain in bulk in deep bins was well-known. He was a world expert in the bulk-handling of grain and coal and designed silos in many parts of the world, including Ireland. The imposing structure on Victoria Quay, built to his designs was an outstanding landmark in Cork for its day.
The huge mass of 600 tons of internal steel structure was completed by Messrs. Smith & Pearson, Ltd. of Dublin. A large number of additional and local hands were employed by the concreting contractors to assist and expedite the process of erection.
The foundations and the entire concrete work on the building, to the designs of the consulting engineer, were carried out by Messrs Peter Lind & Co., Ltd., of London.


The method of concreting entails the pouring in of liquid cement simultaneously over the whole area, so that every twenty-four hours the mass rose four feet, and so on, every day, to the top. Sand came from local pits. Four thousand tons of Granite chips were brought by Steamer from Browhead, Goleen. These chips were mixed with several thousand tons of cement and sand, and this concrete was knitted, into one solid mass by thousands of intermingling re-inforcing rods throughout the whole area of the structure.
Contained in the building there was over five hundred tons of steel, and overall the building represented a dead weight of over twenty thousand tons. The total height of the building to the top of the elevator tower from street level is 1,35 feet,
The foundation for a heavy mass of this nature, involved careful consideration, Over 400 ferro-concrete piles averaging about 35 feet long were driven into a deep bed of hard dense gravel in order that the carrying capacity of each pile is absolutely assured. All the piles after being driven down are tied together at the top by a massive concrete beams 3′ x 0″ deep, averaging 7′ 0″ wide heavily reinforced by steel roads so designed and placed that the load coming on the foundation was equally distributed.


New Mill and Screenhouse: Constructed of the latest type of re-inforced concrete in 1936, the mill and screenhouse were both five storeys high. The block of buildings were erected by Messrs. P. J. Hegarty and Sons, Builders and Contractors, Upper John Street. The mill proper had a slated and glass roof and the screenhouse, where the wheat was prepared for the mill has a flat roof. The floors are spacious and. steel framed windows admit an abundance of light and ventilation so necessary to an industry producing the most widely used article of human food.
The Cork Examiner on 12 August 1936 describes that the new mill drew wheat automatically from either of the 110-ton bins in the Silo, also from a 5,000 ton grain warehouse adjoining. The wheat was treated to a most elaborate series of separation, scouring, grading washing, drying, brushing, aspirating, etc., and was fitted with machinery enabling exact control to be exercised at each operation while the wheat flowed through a network of elevators, conveyors, spouts, etc., to the final grinding bins.

Odlums and the future: Odlums operated their flour mills venture there from 1965 for a time. The building now re-awaits a new purpose in the present day re-configuration of Cork’s South Docks.


R & H Hall Grain Silos:


R & H Hall was one of Ireland’s biggest importers and suppliers of animal feed ingredients for feed manufacturers. The company was established in 1839 and provided grain stores on Cork’s quays. The iconic silos still in existence date from the mid 1930s to the early 1950s. The company was bought by the IAWS Group in September 1990. It has operations at deep-water port locations at Cork city, Ringaskiddy, Dublin, Waterford, Foynes and Belfast, and provides a specialised bulk cereal handling, drying, screening and storage service. The company’s Cork complex is part of a site earmarked by the City Council for a multi-billion docklands regeneration project.
 

stan ogden

Full Member
^^ was the beautiful 1919 building knocked to build the silos? If so ‘beauty and the beast’ comes to mind. Beauty and the beast was a term also applied to the new Connolly Hall and the Cork Savings Bank. There’d be an outcry I’d say if they tried to knock Connolly Hall. It’s so bad it’s good and people get used to it. I even like Merchant Quay, though I know the norries don’t, as they look down the hill at it.
 
259426079_126203726487523_3371095794230264591_n.jpg



1919 and 2019 - Cork Flour Mills.


By 1810 Cork had become a big market for flour especially with brewers and distillers. The milling trade has passed through a complete revolution in the process of manufacture during the last forty years. Up to the years 1875 to 1880 the only method of manufacturing flour was grinding by millstones, the wheat being ground between two flat circular stones.

Cork National Flour Mills: Between 1875 and 1880 Cork became one of the first milling centres in Ireland to adopt the roller process, and a number of well-equipped mills in the City and County were constructed, in which some 70,000 tons of wheat was milled annually, and in addition, close on 90,000 tons of maize was ground. A large and landmark mill and warehouse complex known as the Cork National Flour Mills on Cork’s South Docks was built in 1892.
Cork Milling Company: By the time of the Irish Free State government, the Cork Milling Company was formed and took over the Cork National Flour Mills site. It was greatly influenced by the imposition of tariffs on foreign-milled flour, and the Government’s invitation to put up mills within the emerging Free State. The Cork Milling Company, Ltd. comprised John Furlong & Sons (1920) Ltd., Marina Mills, Cork, J. and R. Webb, Ltd., Mallow Mills, Mallow and Glandalane Mills, Fermoy; T. Hallinan & Sons (1932) Ltd, Avoncore Mills, Midleton; and J. W. MacMullen & Sons, Ltd., Cork.


New Offices: In September 1932, in order to accommodate adequately their staff, the Cork Milling Company opened new offices on Victoria Quay. The building was erected on an almost triangular site with two street frontages, and the main entrance was placed on the more important Victoria Road. Externally the building has modern tendencies which are accentuated by the shape of the site and the treatment of the first floor. Internally the ground floor was designed to accommodate a very large staff in the general office, which has a floor area of 1,700 sq. feet, with three directors’ rooms in addition.
New Plant: The work of preparing the plans for a building capable of housing a modern flour-milling plant was entrusted to the noted Cork architects, Messrs Chillingworth and Levie, and in September 1933 work began on the erection and completed in July 1934. The contractors for the building were Messrs. John Sisk and Son. According to the Cork Examiner, although there was an original building on the present site, the work entailed a large amount of engineering skill, and, thanks to the Consulting Engineer Mr J L O’Connell, the reusability of adapting the older premises as a mill, was accomplished. The original walls were supported on timber piles. These walls were raised considerably and the original floor area was doubled, and in order to ensure a thoroughly substantial job, a complete framework of steel was raised up within the main walls, each stanchion of which was supported by a concrete pile, the idea being to save the original fabric from damage by vibration.


New Grain Silo: In 1934, the Cork Examiner reported that the construction of a twelve thousand five hundred tons Grain Silo was finished at the Marina Mills, Victoria Quay for The Cork Milling Company.
The Company engaged the services of English engineer Mr William Littlejohn Philip, O.B.E., a consulting engineer, whose very extensive knowledge and experience in storing grain in bulk in deep bins was well-known. He was a world expert in the bulk-handling of grain and coal and designed silos in many parts of the world, including Ireland. The imposing structure on Victoria Quay, built to his designs was an outstanding landmark in Cork for its day.
The huge mass of 600 tons of internal steel structure was completed by Messrs. Smith & Pearson, Ltd. of Dublin. A large number of additional and local hands were employed by the concreting contractors to assist and expedite the process of erection.
The foundations and the entire concrete work on the building, to the designs of the consulting engineer, were carried out by Messrs Peter Lind & Co., Ltd., of London.


The method of concreting entails the pouring in of liquid cement simultaneously over the whole area, so that every twenty-four hours the mass rose four feet, and so on, every day, to the top. Sand came from local pits. Four thousand tons of Granite chips were brought by Steamer from Browhead, Goleen. These chips were mixed with several thousand tons of cement and sand, and this concrete was knitted, into one solid mass by thousands of intermingling re-inforcing rods throughout the whole area of the structure.
Contained in the building there was over five hundred tons of steel, and overall the building represented a dead weight of over twenty thousand tons. The total height of the building to the top of the elevator tower from street level is 1,35 feet,
The foundation for a heavy mass of this nature, involved careful consideration, Over 400 ferro-concrete piles averaging about 35 feet long were driven into a deep bed of hard dense gravel in order that the carrying capacity of each pile is absolutely assured. All the piles after being driven down are tied together at the top by a massive concrete beams 3′ x 0″ deep, averaging 7′ 0″ wide heavily reinforced by steel roads so designed and placed that the load coming on the foundation was equally distributed.


New Mill and Screenhouse: Constructed of the latest type of re-inforced concrete in 1936, the mill and screenhouse were both five storeys high. The block of buildings were erected by Messrs. P. J. Hegarty and Sons, Builders and Contractors, Upper John Street. The mill proper had a slated and glass roof and the screenhouse, where the wheat was prepared for the mill has a flat roof. The floors are spacious and. steel framed windows admit an abundance of light and ventilation so necessary to an industry producing the most widely used article of human food.
The Cork Examiner on 12 August 1936 describes that the new mill drew wheat automatically from either of the 110-ton bins in the Silo, also from a 5,000 ton grain warehouse adjoining. The wheat was treated to a most elaborate series of separation, scouring, grading washing, drying, brushing, aspirating, etc., and was fitted with machinery enabling exact control to be exercised at each operation while the wheat flowed through a network of elevators, conveyors, spouts, etc., to the final grinding bins.

Odlums and the future: Odlums operated their flour mills venture there from 1965 for a time. The building now re-awaits a new purpose in the present day re-configuration of Cork’s South Docks.


R & H Hall Grain Silos:


R & H Hall was one of Ireland’s biggest importers and suppliers of animal feed ingredients for feed manufacturers. The company was established in 1839 and provided grain stores on Cork’s quays. The iconic silos still in existence date from the mid 1930s to the early 1950s. The company was bought by the IAWS Group in September 1990. It has operations at deep-water port locations at Cork city, Ringaskiddy, Dublin, Waterford, Foynes and Belfast, and provides a specialised bulk cereal handling, drying, screening and storage service. The company’s Cork complex is part of a site earmarked by the City Council for a multi-billion docklands regeneration project.
Your 1919 building pictured top is not the same building as that was much further west along the quay.


FFCJbYUWUAMOix9
 
The original building was extended in 1932 with the addition of two extra floors. With the passage of time this has now been accepted as “beautiful.”

I presume that back in 1932 some luddites were complaining about the extension.

But there was no internet back then, so it was probably some langer inside in The Idle Hour at the bar.
 

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