Jesus lads, 'tis looking like BREXIT!

How bad boy

Full Member
Can someone cleverer explain this to me:


It says Ireland’s productivity per hour is the highest of any country; but further down the report put it at Number 8..........???
It's poorly presented.

Ireland's GDP figures are a mess due to flows of corporate income and reserves that flow through the country.

It's not clear if the figures in the list are Purchasing power parity or not, which makes a significant difference (although I can't imagine it would drop Ireland below Norway).

The figures in the narrative list don't match the below list for other countries too. It's a badly written article.

I suspect the top figures are unadjusted and the bottom figures have some level of adjustment for those flows
 
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They were convinced to make themselves poorer by placing economic sanctions upon themselves.

Unfortunately, their ongoing decline also affects us.
Their decline will present us with opportunities: we just need to be more assertive, which will become easier as they descend into chaos.
 
Their decline will present us with opportunities: we just need to be more assertive, which will become easier as they descend into chaos.
30 years ago, this U.K. economic meltdown would have been a disaster for us however now U.K. trade is down at about 9% of our overall trade as we have almost fully re-orientated to the larger wealthier open E.U. trading bloc rather than the declining isolationist U.K.

Ireland gets the Brexit boost.
 

El Guapo

Full Member
30 years ago, this U.K. economic meltdown would have been a disaster for us however now U.K. trade is down at about 9% of our overall trade as we have almost fully re-orientated to the larger wealthier open E.U. trading bloc rather than the declining isolationist U.K.

Ireland gets the Brexit boost.
I agree with that. Its a good optimistic way to look at it

Mairead McGuinness was encouraging SMEs to think direct trade. I guess the language barrier is an issue for a lot but you could imagine a lot of small companies doing great business once the get into french/german supply chains.

I think the west cork distillery in skibb went from about 20 employees to about 80 off the back of a Carrefour contract.


It may even change things like how language learning is viewed in the education system with all sorts of knock on effects to emigration patterns and the like
 

How bad boy

Full Member
30 years ago, this U.K. economic meltdown would have been a disaster for us however now U.K. trade is down at about 9% of our overall trade as we have almost fully re-orientated to the larger wealthier open E.U. trading bloc rather than the declining isolationist U.K.

Ireland gets the Brexit boost.
Irish exports to the UK have been in long term decline since 2008. Current levels are the same as 1999:
1660121892864.png

You can see 2016 very, very clearly on the graph.
Overall, that graph surprises me.
 
Irish exports to the UK have been in long term decline since 2008. Current levels are the same as 1999:
View attachment 14002

You can see 2016 very, very clearly on the graph.
Overall, that graph surprises me.
The food and drink sector of imports to the U.K. from Ireland is huge as well as Pharma.

C-19 has to fully wash through as well as Brexit in a few years before we get a good picture.
 

How bad boy

Full Member
The Energy Price Cap craic by Ofgem is utter, utter lunacy, particularly egregious is the Market Stabilisation Charge (MSC).

In a way, I could take the price rises, if they were going to be competed out once the price falls.
But they won't be:

"The MSC has not yet been triggered, and currently, suppliers would only be required to make a payment to the losing supplier if wholesale prices fall by more than 30% compared to those used to set the price cap. Ofgem has now decided that from 25 May, the threshold at which the MSC will be triggered will reduce from 30% below the wholesale prices used to set the cap level to 10%. Ofgem is also proposing to extend the MSC so that it remains in place until March 2023.

If suppliers are required to pay the MSC when taking on customers they will likely factor this into the tariff offerings they are bringing to the market. Ofgem has said that 85% of suppliers’ costs incurred by purchasing energy in advance will be covered by the MSC, meaning that if the charge is activated, and wholesale prices have dropped significantly, suppliers are not likely to be able to immediately pass the savings on to customers through tariffs that substantially undercut the level of the price cap. However, the arrangements protect suppliers that have hedged in line with the price cap from incurring major losses, helping to limit market exits which will ultimately benefit consumers in the long run."



Fucking moronic stuff.
 
I agree with that. Its a good optimistic way to look at it

Mairead McGuinness was encouraging SMEs to think direct trade. I guess the language barrier is an issue for a lot but you could imagine a lot of small companies doing great business once the get into french/german supply chains.

I think the west cork distillery in skibb went from about 20 employees to about 80 off the back of a Carrefour contract.


It may even change things like how language learning is viewed in the education system with all sorts of knock on effects to emigration patterns and the like
Irish products have replaced a lot of British products on supermarket shelves across the continent and most Europeans have a very good grasp of English anyway but Irish S.M.E.'s could do a lot more work promoting their great products and they will in time do well.
 

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