Woman murdered in Tullamore..

I admire Matlock's perseverance and those in the legal profession tend to be very pedantic and literal when answering questions so technically Matlock is right, the message is not that we as men need to take ownership for Aisling's murder itself.

However the broader point is being made. It is ALL MEN. Not that all men demean, belittle, emotionally abuse, physically abuse, stalk etc. But that the tiny minority that do is the responsibility of ALL MEN.

There have been numerous op-ed pieces from the usual suspects since the murder making this point.

The vast vast majority of men do not need to correct their behaviour because the vast vast majority of men do not behave as above. For the small minority of men that do - then they should be treated accordingly, charged accordingly, convicted accordingly and punished accordingly. As I posted before - this is a them and us thing according to most commentators. The vast majority of people treat each other with respect and manners. The small minority of people who don't need to be dealt with accordingly.

This plays into the narrative that all men are potential rapists or bastards or a threat - when the actuality of it is that the overwhelming majority are not. And that's before we talk about the fact that women are not universal paragons of virtue either but let's leave that aside before we fall foul of the whatabouttery elves.

Education should teach all kids, boys and girls, to respect each other, behave with respect towards each other, not bully or victimise or threaten or attack. As kids grow older that should extend to secondary school and to the sort of consent classes that you see at 3rd level etc. After that, if a man attacks or kills a woman or indeed if a woman attacks or kills a man - they are the problem and they need to be punished to the full extent of the law - with the judicial system fully equipped to bring more charges, more cases, more convictions and more deterrent type mandatory sentencing as required.
Didn't read.
 
thats politics, especially in Ireland Betty. No politician every does anything solely for the cause, its all about public perception

If it were my sister I would want none of them, or the cameras present.
It is political but all politics here are local and in 20 years time when they talk about the daughter/sister that they lost they will talk about the support of the country including our most senior dignitaries etc to hopefully help sustain them at this the most difficult time.

The next job for this State to do is to secure a prosecution.
 

MerchantOfEnnis

Full Member
Families of previous murder victims must be wondering what set this murder aside form the murder of their loved one?
If a woman is murdered again in the future it'll be interesting to see what the reaction is relative to this.

Is this the new norm for when a female is murdered in Ireland? Televised funeral attended by the Taoiseach, sports clubs and shopping centres offering their condolences, and blanket media coverage about how awful men are?
 
I admire Matlock's perseverance and those in the legal profession tend to be very pedantic and literal when answering questions so technically Matlock is right, the message is not that we as men need to take ownership for Aisling's murder itself.

However the broader point is being made. It is ALL MEN. Not that all men demean, belittle, emotionally abuse, physically abuse, stalk etc. But that the tiny minority that do is the responsibility of ALL MEN.

There have been numerous op-ed pieces from the usual suspects since the murder making this point.

The vast vast majority of men do not need to correct their behaviour because the vast vast majority of men do not behave as above. For the small minority of men that do - then they should be treated accordingly, charged accordingly, convicted accordingly and punished accordingly. As I posted before - this is a them and us thing according to most commentators. The vast majority of people treat each other with respect and manners. The small minority of people who don't need to be dealt with accordingly.

This plays into the narrative that all men are potential rapists or bastards or a threat - when the actuality of it is that the overwhelming majority are not. And that's before we talk about the fact that women are not universal paragons of virtue either but let's leave that aside before we fall foul of the whatabouttery elves.

Education should teach all kids, boys and girls, to respect each other, behave with respect towards each other, not bully or victimise or threaten or attack. As kids grow older that should extend to secondary school and to the sort of consent classes that you see at 3rd level etc. After that, if a man attacks or kills a woman or indeed if a woman attacks or kills a man - they are the problem and they need to be punished to the full extent of the law - with the judicial system fully equipped to bring more charges, more cases, more convictions and more deterrent type mandatory sentencing as required.
It already does PROCna, in primary school there is huge focus on teaching kids about their own emotions and feelings, and then extending that to recognising other childrens. That progresses on to how you affect those feelings, having respect, not bullying etc.

I'm not as clear on secondary school as we haven't got there yet, and it is too long since I was there to be relevant, but I would bet it is a similar approach for older children.

College is different - I guess the approach has always been that the students are adults and are treated as such

There is no point telling all men to own this, they already do their bit in the vast majority of situations. If society as a whole wants to broaden what might now be considered more appropriate behaviour/considerations towards women in circumstances where they are not currently afforded it then that is fine too, but it is not a MAN thing.
 

Matlock

Full Member
If a woman is murdered again in the future it'll be interesting to see what the reaction is relative to this.

Is this the new norm for when a female is murdered in Ireland? Televised funeral attended by the Taoiseach, sports clubs and shopping centres offering their condolences, and blanket media coverage about how awful men are?
Its almost as if we are trying to make the point that this is about more than just this one murder....
 

Hank Scorpio

Full Member
It already does PROCna, in primary school there is huge focus on teaching kids about their own emotions and feelings, and then extending that to recognising other childrens. That progresses on to how you affect those feelings, having respect, not bullying etc.

I'm not as clear on secondary school as we haven't got there yet, and it is too long since I was there to be relevant, but I would bet it is a similar approach for older children.

College is different - I guess the approach has always been that the students are adults and are treated as such

There is no point telling all men to own this, they already do their bit in the vast majority of situations. If society as a whole wants to broaden what might now be considered more appropriate behaviour/considerations towards women in circumstances where they are not currently afforded it then that is fine too, but it is not a MAN thing.


I think they can probably stretch the man bashing out until next week if theres an arrest.


The whole business is disgusting tbh.




Agreed with you on cameras and politicians coming along to the funeral. Wouldnt want them anywhere near it.
 

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