Percentage of Irish speakers continues to fall - going bang ?

CaptainSensible - You have more false arguments and factually untrue statements for us.

The same conclusion could not be reached about why English and Maths are compulsory for the Leaving Cert. Unlike English and Maths, the justification for why the Irish language is compulsory is based on lies. The dogs in the street know this. This is why the language itself continues to decline. Everybody knows this including the Irish language movement but they refuse to publicly admit this because their income from the state is dependent on these lies.

1) Irish is not and never will be 'our' language. To claim otherwise is a lie.

2) To claim that the Irish language is used in commerce and business or in any workplace today outside the education system and state/state subsidised media is a lie.

There is a reason why the Irish language doesn't exist in the private sector - there is no demand for it.

Maths and English are required for almost every job. You cannot function effectively in western societies without Maths and English.

According to the previous census, more people in Ireland speak Polish, French and German on a daily basis than speak Irish. You have more chance of meeting an Irish person speaking these languages that you do an Irish person speaking Irish.

Personally, I have lost count of the number of times I have seen Irish people talking to their foreign born partners in French or German. It is commonplace in Cork. It happens in cafes and pubs regularly. Try going into UCC, CIT, the Crane Lane, the Roundy House or try working in Apple (Cork's largest employer). We are an integrated European society.

You asked 'How many Irish people go to France for a job?'
Quite a lot and not just to teach English after doing a TEFL course. Clearly you have never heard of the people studying Commerce and French or Commerce and German in university or people working for multi-nationals. In some instances, you cannot qualify for your degree or progress in the workplace unless you have worked abroad and that includes working in France obviously.

You falsely claimed 'Yes Irish is obligatory for the Leaving and so are the others mentioned above'.
Your statement is factually untrue. Foreign languages are not compulsory subjects for the Leaving Cert unlike the non-functional dead language that is Irish, which remains compulsory. If you choose not to study a foreign language, then you do not have to study it for your Leaving Cert.

At the end of the day, you are entitled to your opinion even if it is not evidence-based, but you are not entitled to your own made up facts.

There is no good reason on this earth why Irish second level students should not have their right to choose. The Irish language should be an optional subject for the Leaving Cert.
You don't like Irish, I get it.
But the one thing we agree on is you're entitled to your opinion, absolutely, but not your own facts.

Most of your argument is assertion and continuously avoids the elephant in the room. To be fair, some of my original argument was assertion too.

Have a good rest of the day.
 
Whatever about it being compulsory, the idea that failing it, should stop you going to University, if you can get the points you need, to me seems ridiculous. Unless you're doing primary teaching or something related to it.

I just about got through Irish. But to do that, it took so much time away from subjects was actually alright at, because I was so bad at it.
Something is seriously not right when you can spend all of primary school doing a language, yet still be so much better at something like French, which I only started in secondary.
 
Whatever about it being compulsory, the idea that failing it, should stop you going to University, if you can get the points you need, to me seems ridiculous. Unless you're doing primary teaching or something related to it.

I just about got through Irish. But to do that, it took so much time away from subjects was actually alright at, because I was so bad at it.
Something is seriously not right when you can spend all of primary school doing a language, yet still be so much better at something like French, which I only started in secondary.
If you fail foundation level Irish, you have no business in university.
 
Whatever about it being compulsory, the idea that failing it, should stop you going to University, if you can get the points you need, to me seems ridiculous. Unless you're doing primary teaching or something related to it.

I just about got through Irish. But to do that, it took so much time away from subjects was actually alright at, because I was so bad at it.
Something is seriously not right when you can spend all of primary school doing a language, yet still be so much better at something like French, which I only started in secondary.
Great points. As I think I said at the start, my young fella is coasting his LC honours Irish because he reckons the amount of work required to get a H2 would take from his efforts in other subjects. He's doing an 8th subject outside school and has every chance of getting a H2 at least.

At last they've started teaching a modern European language in primary school. Hopefully the amount of time spent on that will increase.
 
I thought you had to do normal level to get in to University anyway?

I just don't think however bad you are at a particular subject, that it should impede you from going to University, if that subject had nothing to do with your course.
I thought it was 12 Irish language exemptions in my son's year, in fact it's in excess of 20 and many of those failed 😉 the test to get the exemption.
 
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