Batsh*t Crazy Green Party

M Cooper had 2 on his show to discuss the fall in sales in EV's. there only solution was that we are not educated enough to buy electric vechicle's. I had a choice last year i bought a kia xceed petrol for 10 k less than i would have paid for a hybrid version with a battery that did only 32 miles per full charge.
 
Yeah, I was listening to some report last evening and they were saying that there's been a drop in the percentage of market on Electric Cars. They reckoned that the relatively cheap petrol/diesel prices (you wha Gay?) and the expensive cost of Electricity has had an influence.

The elephant in the room with regard to the purchase of electric cars is the battery deterioration and the knock-on very poor second-hand market in them. They depreciate like a mofo.
On fourth EV here, 180,000km electric driving. If you're charging at home EVs cost feck all to run - I'm paying about €45 a month in electricity to go ~2000km - and even that is a substantial rise from a couple of years ago. Far cry from the days I was spending €300 a month on petrol! Servicing costs are minimal - the electric drive train normally does not need any servicing. My own car has no scheduled maintenance whatsoever although keep it long enough and you'll have to do the brakes (much later than in an ICE though) and suspension I guess - plus tyres of course. Living in an apartment or somewhere you can't have a home charge? Different story there!

Lot of myths out there re batteries from people who've never owned an EV. Deterioration isn't really a thing. Sure, keep it many years and maybe you'll only be able to charge it up to 80% of its original capacity but, outside of some early models, you're talking long timeframes here - and even then, just charge more often, the car still works! The most common battery myth I hear is "bUt It'Ll CoSt A fOrTuNe FoR a NeW bAtTeRy AfTeR fIvE yEaRs" (or three years, or eight years, depends on who's shiteing on). As an early adopter I know lots of EV drivers over many years and I can only recall one having to get a new battery - and that was covered under warranty! Battery failure just isn't a problem.

Other big myth is that they cost a fortune - this invariably comes from folks who have no idea just how expensive new cars in general have got. Wanna buy a mid spec largeish family crossover (such as the Hyundai Tucson, most popular car in Ireland)? You're up over 40 grand straight away in most cases, regardless of power source. Every single one of my EVs has been substantially cheaper than an ICE equivalent, and that's going back to 2015. I will acknowledge though that with most of those you're comparing against a relatively high spec ICE (i.e. auto, sat nav, etc). But now even that differential is gone and for the same price as that mid spec manual Tuscson you can sit into a new ID4 or Tesla Model Y (the latter in particular is fully loaded with kit) - and enjoy the vastly cheaper running costs, smoother ride, and much faster acceleration. No brainer for me really.....

Depreciation - up and down. My first Leaf wasn't great but my last trade in (last year) got me almost the amount I'd paid for it after two years so it's swings and roundabouts. Something often forgotten in the depreciation debate is the principal reason for it - new cars have got cheaper so second hand values have dropped. So your new car is also cheaper so cost to change may actually not be excessive.
 
Yeah, I was listening to some report last evening and they were saying that there's been a drop in the percentage of market on Electric Cars. They reckoned that the relatively cheap petrol/diesel prices (you wha Gay?) and the expensive cost of Electricity has had an influence.

The elephant in the room with regard to the purchase of electric cars is the battery deterioration and the knock-on very poor second-hand market in them. They depreciate like a mofo.
Not really true.

There is a lot of myths and falsehoods in regards BEV's.
 
M Cooper had 2 on his show to discuss the fall in sales in EV's. there only solution was that we are not educated enough to buy electric vechicle's. I had a choice last year i bought a kia xceed petrol for 10 k less than i would have paid for a hybrid version with a battery that did only 32 miles per full charge.

There is going to be a plethora of sub €25k EV cars being released this year.
The ICE vs BEV price difference is fast going to be in favour of the BEV and along with the cheaper running costs? A BEV is going to be a no brainer for up front costs and running costs.
 
On fourth EV here, 180,000km electric driving. If you're charging at home EVs cost feck all to run - I'm paying about €45 a month in electricity to go ~2000km - and even that is a substantial rise from a couple of years ago. Far cry from the days I was spending €300 a month on petrol! Servicing costs are minimal - the electric drive train normally does not need any servicing. My own car has no scheduled maintenance whatsoever although keep it long enough and you'll have to do the brakes (much later than in an ICE though) and suspension I guess - plus tyres of course. Living in an apartment or somewhere you can't have a home charge? Different story there!

Lot of myths out there re batteries from people who've never owned an EV. Deterioration isn't really a thing. Sure, keep it many years and maybe you'll only be able to charge it up to 80% of its original capacity but, outside of some early models, you're talking long timeframes here - and even then, just charge more often, the car still works! The most common battery myth I hear is "bUt It'Ll CoSt A fOrTuNe FoR a NeW bAtTeRy AfTeR fIvE yEaRs" (or three years, or eight years, depends on who's shiteing on). As an early adopter I know lots of EV drivers over many years and I can only recall one having to get a new battery - and that was covered under warranty! Battery failure just isn't a problem.

Other big myth is that they cost a fortune - this invariably comes from folks who have no idea just how expensive new cars in general have got. Wanna buy a mid spec largeish family crossover (such as the Hyundai Tucson, most popular car in Ireland)? You're up over 40 grand straight away in most cases, regardless of power source. Every single one of my EVs has been substantially cheaper than an ICE equivalent, and that's going back to 2015. I will acknowledge though that with most of those you're comparing against a relatively high spec ICE (i.e. auto, sat nav, etc). But now even that differential is gone and for the same price as that mid spec manual Tuscson you can sit into a new ID4 or Tesla Model Y (the latter in particular is fully loaded with kit) - and enjoy the vastly cheaper running costs, smoother ride, and much faster acceleration. No brainer for me really.....

Depreciation - up and down. My first Leaf wasn't great but my last trade in (last year) got me almost the amount I'd paid for it after two years so it's swings and roundabouts. Something often forgotten in the depreciation debate is the principal reason for it - new cars have got cheaper so second hand values have dropped. So your new car is also cheaper so cost to change may actually not be excessive.
Your last point is sound.

A few years ago EV's were too expensive, they cried.
A car for the well-off middle classes they moaned

Now that the prices have come down hugely, the same people are crying again about it.

Just the other day, the CEO of Audi stated that in 2026 ICE sales is going to fall off a cliff, as the inflection point of EV vs ICE finally snaps in favour of EV's.
 
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