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  #21  
Old 20-06-2011, 08:54 AM
tobyscoby tobyscoby is offline
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It's quite sad really, that the Irish language, which for centuries was used by people who were oppressed is now itself being used as a means to exclude disadavantaged people and immigrants.
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  #22  
Old 20-06-2011, 08:59 AM
tobyscoby tobyscoby is offline
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Mayfield community school is half empty, and it has excellent leisure facilities. Why not allocate a portion of it for the proposed Gaeilscoil?

Or don't the parents of the gaelscoil students want their kids mixing with the students of the community school?
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  #23  
Old 20-06-2011, 09:30 AM
Corcaigh32 Corcaigh32 is offline
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There is a growing tendency to tar anyone with an interest in gaelscoileanna as some sort of ultra right language nazi. For what it's worth, a migrant's child starting in a gaelscoil will have exactly the same knowledge of an Ghaeilge as SBP's Emily's child or any other parent's. You'd wonder what the actual issue is - are we in Ringaskiddy/Rossport territory with the latest entrant for the NIMBY cup or is there a genuine reason to prevent this school from going ahead. As far as I am aware and I am open to correction - there will be no loss of amenity under the proposal and there will be a gaelscoil in the area. Like it or not, gaelscoileanna do seem to get better results, you'd wonder is that down to the fact that parents who care enough to ensure gaelscoileanna are set up are therefore more interested in their child's education. Anecdotal evidence from teachers I know would seem to indicate that is the case.
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  #24  
Old 20-06-2011, 09:34 AM
BlueMagic BlueMagic is offline
 
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What is all this tank field business about in a nutshell? What is the Al Queida business all about?
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  #25  
Old 20-06-2011, 09:58 AM
tobyscoby tobyscoby is offline
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There is loads of room in the Mayfield community school. Why not build it there? On an existing educational campus? Complete with all weather pitches, a leisure centre and a swimming pool?

Three minutes walk away. Why spend public money building yet another start up educational facility when there is an underused one in the same area? Why use up green amenity spaces for a school when there is ample space on another school site in the same vicinity?
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  #26  
Old 20-06-2011, 09:59 AM
tobyscoby tobyscoby is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corcaigh32 View Post
There is a growing tendency to tar anyone with an interest in gaelscoileanna as some sort of ultra right language nazi. For what it's worth, a migrant's child starting in a gaelscoil will have exactly the same knowledge of an Ghaeilge as SBP's Emily's child or any other parent's. You'd wonder what the actual issue is - are we in Ringaskiddy/Rossport territory with the latest entrant for the NIMBY cup or is there a genuine reason to prevent this school from going ahead. As far as I am aware and I am open to correction - there will be no loss of amenity under the proposal and there will be a gaelscoil in the area. Like it or not, gaelscoileanna do seem to get better results, you'd wonder is that down to the fact that parents who care enough to ensure gaelscoileanna are set up are therefore more interested in their child's education. Anecdotal evidence from teachers I know would seem to indicate that is the case.

How can you build a school on a green amenity space without "Loss of amenity?"
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  #27  
Old 20-06-2011, 10:03 AM
Stacky Stacky is online now
 
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My Mrs. recently delivered and collected 452 Census forms and was warned to offer an Irish language version of the form as there were Irish language zealouts ready to pounce if an Irish language form was not offered at the door.

No one wanted an Irish language form and a few were very dismissive of the waste of money printing them.

Ironically she was asked for 7 Polish language forms, 1 Czech, and 2 French.
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  #28  
Old 20-06-2011, 10:07 AM
Walter Sobchak Walter Sobchak is offline
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TRANSLATING 60,000 pages of statutory instruments into the Irish language is likely to cost the state at least €3m.

A massive backlog of the legislation, which is rarely read even in English, will have to be cleared by a new translation unit which is being set up within the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs.

A job as director of the new unit was advertised last week offering an annual salary of up to €133,000, but dozens more jobs will also have to be created to carry out the massive task.

A Supreme Court judgment earlier this year found that the state had failed in its duty to provide all legislation in both official languages.

"We don't know yet what size of a staff the unit will have," said a spokeswoman for the department. "There are no figures available for how much the project will cost and a lot will depend on the director who, when appointed, will look at all of these issues. Individual departments will be customers and will pay for the service. It is a legal requirement and we cannot break the law. There is a constitutional right to have the statutory instruments translated."

The department said the new translation unit had not been subject to the recruitment freeze because a specific undertaking had been given by the state when it lost the Supreme Court case.

Documents filed in that case disclosed that, between 1993 and 2004, 46,000 pages of statutory instruments were created, all of which are untranslated. In the four years since, 12,000 to 20,000 more pages of statutory instruments have been published.

The project, if contracted to the private sector at current rates, could end up costing the state €3m to €5m. Translating even a single page of the complex legal jargon will cost at least €50. Opponents of the plan have criticised the expenditure.

"It is extraordinary that funds are being spent on translating documents, which are barely if ever read in English, into Irish where they will be read even less frequently," said one Irish-language activist. "All the more so because children attending Gaelscoileanna and Gaeltacht schools are without textbooks on a par with those in the mainstream school system."

However, Cormac Ó hAodha, managing director of Irish language consultancy Oisín, said the new translation unit was the right decision.

"This is an obligation of the highest court in the land and it is not acceptable that the state is not compliant with its own legislation."




Its this kind of thinking that has the country bollixed.
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  #29  
Old 20-06-2011, 10:12 AM
Stacky Stacky is online now
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Walter Sobchak View Post
TRANSLATING 60,000 pages of statutory instruments into the Irish language is likely to cost the state at least €3m.

A massive backlog of the legislation, which is rarely read even in English, will have to be cleared by a new translation unit which is being set up within the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs.

A job as director of the new unit was advertised last week offering an annual salary of up to €133,000, but dozens more jobs will also have to be created to carry out the massive task.

A Supreme Court judgment earlier this year found that the state had failed in its duty to provide all legislation in both official languages.

"We don't know yet what size of a staff the unit will have," said a spokeswoman for the department. "There are no figures available for how much the project will cost and a lot will depend on the director who, when appointed, will look at all of these issues. Individual departments will be customers and will pay for the service. It is a legal requirement and we cannot break the law. There is a constitutional right to have the statutory instruments translated."

The department said the new translation unit had not been subject to the recruitment freeze because a specific undertaking had been given by the state when it lost the Supreme Court case.

Documents filed in that case disclosed that, between 1993 and 2004, 46,000 pages of statutory instruments were created, all of which are untranslated. In the four years since, 12,000 to 20,000 more pages of statutory instruments have been published.

The project, if contracted to the private sector at current rates, could end up costing the state €3m to €5m. Translating even a single page of the complex legal jargon will cost at least €50. Opponents of the plan have criticised the expenditure.

"It is extraordinary that funds are being spent on translating documents, which are barely if ever read in English, into Irish where they will be read even less frequently," said one Irish-language activist. "All the more so because children attending Gaelscoileanna and Gaeltacht schools are without textbooks on a par with those in the mainstream school system."

However, Cormac Ó hAodha, managing director of Irish language consultancy Oisín, said the new translation unit was the right decision.

"This is an obligation of the highest court in the land and it is not acceptable that the state is not compliant with its own legislation."




Its this kind of thinking that has the country bollixed.
Clare County Council spend hundreds of thousands paying for an Irish language version of their County Development Plan available behind the counter of the planning Department.

Not one Irish language copy was requested.

Shove it on to a website as a PDF for a download.
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  #30  
Old 20-06-2011, 10:17 AM
Walter Sobchak Walter Sobchak is offline
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Well largely thanks to Nepotistic brainboxes like Eamon O'Cuiv we can now not enjoy Swedish fishery reports translated into Irish to never be read by anyone, anywhere all at out or own expense and convenience.
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