The Mick Lynch appreciation thread .

SoundMan

Full Member
On the subject of unions i hear whispers that connolly hall could be sold for development,
most staff are working from home ,

Would be a good move imho if the money was properly invested in the union.

Alas very difficult to get face to face with paid union officials these days, it's almost exclusively zoom/team meetings. That's not a good thing imho.
 

How bad boy

Full Member
I'm assuming Mick was an adherent to the Lexit idea, one which didn't get much of a hearing.

Summarising it briefly, there's a lot of EU rules that those on the further reaches of the left object to, such as state aid, competitive bidding, domestic bias, patent recognition, open market access, balance of powers, etc...

China illustrates this quite nicely, it used to be almost impossible to set up independently in China if you were a foreign company. And if you did, god help you.
Cause the courts wouldn't.
The Communist party appoints judges.
This is a problem, especially if you want to be a Wholly Foreign Owned Entity (WFOE) which is competing against a State Owned Entity (SOE) or Joint Venture (JV) between a domestic, communist party controlled company and a foreign company.

Because of course, they can sue you off the pitch quite easily. The laws are frequently written so they are highly open to interpretation. An SOE or JV wants to put a WFOE out of business?
Easy, bring a case to court and get your judge friend in the communist party to rule for you. Happens all the time. Until a few years ago, Chinese judges barely had to be qualified to practice law.

So as a foreign company, you think "Great, joint venture". You find a Chinese joint venture partner to do business with.


Do you have Intellectual Property? Great, now your joint venture partner has it. And they have just set up a parallel division to compete with you.
Have a problem with that? You could always try suing them....

This approach massively helped China advance. It's hard to understate how big a factor this was in getting China up to speed technologically.

The EU forbids shenanigans like that. Which many of those on the left think is ridiculous, you should be able to massively bias for your own companies, look after your own.

State subsidies and infant industry support are others where the EU has structures built to prevent it (albeit with loopholes).

Say you wanted to create a domestic industry building motorbikes. You could just ban the importation of motorbikes, forcing everyone in your country to buy whatever bikes get produced domestically. And then subsidise the export of those motorbikes abroad. They might be crap, but in a few years time they'll be competitive.
And eventually, you get fairly good at making motorbikes, and because you're subsidising them, they sell very well internationally. Suddenly, you have an industry that employs lots of people and, if you're lucky, becomes profitable.

Europe had a problem in the post war era where lots of countries tried this. If all of your competing countries are trying to do it, it fails miserable, the vast majority of the money spent is completely wasted*.

But if your competing countries aren't allowed to do it because of EU rules and you're allowed to undermine private companies with state funding, you can do VERY well with this strategy, putting a lot of dirty capitalists out of business.

Once again, China did this very well.

There's a good book that at least explains the ideas behind this by Ha Joon Chang:


I don't think these ideas are given half as much time as they deserve as most of them were written off in the 70s, but China has clearly demonstrated they're worth looking at again. And the EU is structurally built to block any large scale attempts to replicate them outside of the defence industry (where it's rampant, c.f. US military spending)


*This again is an arguable point with the left because while it's not making an immediate profit, it's providing well paid, respectable work for the workforce and potentially the multiplier effects pay off. It's very, very messy economically.
 

SoundMan

Full Member
Local Radio journalist stirred the pot too - I'm sure he and his producers knew there was no merit in their action but with his erstwhile boss pulling in new listeners, a bit of fake news populism and faux outrage was called for.

To be fair to Unions here, they know the law and will squeeze the employers at every available opportunity, some may argue to excess at times. If they tell their members an action is not worth pursuing, they should be listened to.

Politicians and local radio hacks chasing votes and listeners, giving the workers false hope and encouragement ultimately leads down a disappointing cul de sac!!

Depends on what they tell their members is the reason. Many genuine greivances of union members get horse-traded by the union officials in my experience. It mightn't in the Union hierarchy's opinion be worth pursuing a merited case for a few members. That's not the way a union should be but it's the way a number of them are.
 

SoundMan

Full Member
The strike by all accounts was a failure. A lot of people stayed at home as they were used to working from home during the pandemic. I think at this stage Mick was just a flash in the pan

Do you know what the aim of the strike was? (Hint - it wasn't to stop people from working from home or to make people stop using the trains long-term)
 

SoundMan

Full Member
Because he is an idiot? There is a thread here about Brexit and Brexiteers have been referred to by worse terms but shur because this lad is Irish he gets a free pass, sorry now but that is a load of shite and shows yet again shows the complete hypocrisy of this forum.

I wouldn't have voted for Brexit had I a vote in it, and yes in hindsight I think it has been the clusterf**k many predicted. But I think Lynch's reasons for promoting Brexit is he genuinely thought that workers would have been better off in Brexit than in the EU. Very different from the reasons that Farrage or the aforementioned Rees-Mogg were promoting it.

I like Mick Lynch because he's a straight talking guy who is erudite and stands up for the working man. Fair enough, as head of the union that's his job, but I happen to like the way he does it. The cutting quickly to the nub of a matter and calling it straight; the having James Connolly as his political hero and showing up the interviewer's lack of knowledge; the debunking of unquestioned (by BBC anchors) Tory lies; the being a Cork City FC fan from afar, and you can tell he was genuine because he knew more about LoI than many based in Ireland do.

The overall package of Mick Lynch is I think a good one. Even if I do disagree with his stance on Brexit and how it appears from this remove, but then, unlike some, I wouldn't pretend to be more au fait with the the full gamut of prospective pros and cons of Brexit to the british working man than one of their actual Union leaders.
 
He's on the wrong track. He's in danger of getting derailed. He needs to find a better platform for his views. He needs to make sure that he gets his points across. If he is perceived as acting above his station he'll lose. I hope he doesn't have tunnel vision. If he can present an accurate timetable for how he sees this working out he will be ok. He comes across well on the media, I'd say the union paid someone to train him,
 

TheOutdoorThreadmill

Poster of Savage Greatness.
I wouldn't have voted for Brexit had I a vote in it, and yes in hindsight I think it has been the clusterf**k many predicted. But I think Lynch's reasons for promoting Brexit is he genuinely thought that workers would have been better off in Brexit than in the EU. Very different from the reasons that Farrage or the aforementioned Rees-Mogg were promoting it.
Jez, he doubled down on his support for it a few days ago and still maintains they were right to leave the EU and didn't make a mistake.
 
He's on the wrong track. He's in danger of getting derailed. He needs to find a better platform for his views. He needs to make sure that he gets his points across. If he is perceived as acting above his station he'll lose. I hope he doesn't have tunnel vision. If he can present an accurate timetable for how he sees this working out he will be ok. He comes across well on the media, I'd say the union paid someone to train him,
Eventually he'll end up cancelled and people will transfer their support else where by the bus load.
 

daftbrush

Full Member
I suppose you will be organising something for Mick when he is in Cork. Some photo ops .For obvious reason the stickies will not be attending
 

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