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  #11  
Old 25-07-2012, 07:54 PM
an liathroid beag an liathroid beag is offline
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Your father wants you to retire after the Olympics--but in the meantime do us proud and we will carve your name with Pride! ------- O Callaghan, Tisdall, Delaney, Carruth and Taylor --the select Golden few!
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  #12  
Old 25-07-2012, 08:58 PM
afeencalleddan afeencalleddan is offline
 
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Your father wants you to retire after the Olympics--but in the meantime do us proud and we will carve your name with Pride! ------- O Callaghan, Tisdall, Delaney, Carruth and Taylor --the select Golden few!
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Irish Olympians who won pre-1922 deserve their place on our ‘podium’

By Matt Cooper

FRIDAY, JULY 20, 2012

AS JOHN TREACY ran the finishing 100 metres of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic marathon, the RTÉ commentator, Jimmy Magee, listed 12 names.

These, he said proudly, were the men who had won Olympic medals for Ireland; as Treacy crossed the line second, Magee named him excitedly as the 13th.

It was a great achievement for Treacy, already a double world cross-country champion, and a great moment for Irish television viewers: Treacy won Ireland’s only medal of the games, in its final event. Magee was correct in those he named, but in doing so he did not honour the achievements of the Irishmen who won Olympic medals before this State came into existence, and who won those medals for Ireland, even if they wore the colours of other countries.

Two years ago, my friend, Ciaran O’hEadhra, asked me to be a reporter in a television documentary he was making, for broadcast ahead of the London Olympics. He wanted to tell the story of the Irishmen (it was all men) who had competed in the Olympics before the formation of the State.

To my embarrassment, I knew nothing of Martin Sheridan, Peter O’Connor, Tom Kiely, John Daly and others, all Irish-born Olympians. I had thought that Pat O’Callaghan, winner of the gold in the hammer, in Amsterdam, in 1928, and again in Los Angeles four years later, was our first Olympic winner.

O’Callaghan was following in an incredible tradition of Irish field athletes, many of whom specialised in throwing. Most are names known only to the most dedicated of sporting historians, or in the local areas from which they hailed. Yet they have a great history of achievement, not just at Olympic Games, but in other major athletics competitions, too.

Ciaran convinced me that their stories were worthy of telling to a new audience, not just for their individual excellence but for their commitment to their country, which they were denied the opportunity to represent, and of the political gestures they made through sport.

And so, with the assistance of Broadcasting Authority of Ireland funding, our journey through the early years of the modern Olympics began. There is little or no video archive footage of their achievements, but there is a wealth of newspaper coverage and photographs, and there are people who want to keep the history alive.

We made a programme similar to Who Do You Think You Are? except it was about Irish athletic history. It brought us to places such as Athens, London, St Louis, New York and Bohola.

Why Bohola in County Mayo, where we showed the documentary last night to a local audience in the Martin Sheridan Community Centre? Well, it was because of that man Sheridan, who, it can be argued, is the greatest Irish Olympian of all, even if he is rarely recognised, or too easily described as American.

Sheridan was a superstar in the first decade of the 20th century. His obituary in the New York Times described him as "one of the greatest athletes [the United States] has ever known". But he was an Irishman, who emigrated from Mayo at the age of 18, and who sadly, prematurely, died a day before his 37th birthday, in 1918, one of the earliest victims of that year’s terrible flu pandemic.

I visited his grave at Calvary Cemetery in Queens, New York, where the inscription on the giant granite Celtic Cross on his grave reads: "Devoted to the Institutions of his Country, and the Ideals and Aspirations of his Race. Athlete. Patriot."

Sheridan had embraced the opportunities provided to him by emigration to the United States. He served in the New York Police Department, a job that gave him ample opportunity to compete in events for the Irish American Athletic Club (a remarkable institution in itself that contributed significant funds to the fight for Irish independence).

Sheridan was an American hero and retains his place in its sporting history, as we discovered when we visited the USA Track & Field’s ‘hall of fame history gallery’ in Washington Heights, Manhattan. There, to our surprise, among tributes to the likes of Carl Lewis, Jesse Owens and other iconic American athletes, was a display with two of Sheridan’s medals, one from the 1904 Saint Louis games and one from Athens, in 1906. In his own way, in his own time, he was a big star.

But Sheridan was an Irish hero at the time, too, and, unlike many other emigrants who simply could not afford to do so, his sporting achievements meant that he was able to return on occasions to Ireland, such as to visit his brother, who stayed in Ireland and married a sister of Michael Collins. On one of his trips home, he brought a long vault that had been presented to him by the King of Greece in Athens to mark his standing as the finest competitor at the games. It now rests on the wall in the community centre.

The Athens games were marked by a show of Irish defiance, one of the earliest uses of the event to make a political protest. There was an incident at the medal ceremony for Peter O’Connor, who had won second place in the long jump (in highly controversial circumstances, given that many felt political manoeuvring by the British, who were angry with him for insisting on being described as Irish and wearing a green jersey, had denied him gold). When the British flag was raised up the flagpole, O’Connor went after it, to the consternation of the watching Greek and British royalty. He pulled it down and replaced it with a green Irish flag, with a gold harp embossed on it, as the two other (unwilling) Irish members of the British team, helped by American team members, prevented officials from going up after him.

And it was another incident involving a flag that led to the title of this documentary. It has long been believed that the decision of the American team not to dip its flag to Hitler at the 1936 Berlin games was following a precedent set by Sheridan in London in 1908. The story goes that US flag-bearer Ralph Rose refused to dip the flag to King Edward VII on the basis that "this flag dips to no earthly king", an expression of both Irish and American antipathy to the British monarchy. Our documentary discovered a somewhat more complex story, however.

IN the last week, I’ve interviewed many of our previous Olympic greats for the special Last Word Olympic celebration programme that we broadcast, on Today FM yesterday evening from Bohola. I recorded interviews with the likes of Sonia O’Sullivan (silver in 2000); Michael Carruth (gold in 1992); Eamon Coghlan (fourth twice, in 1976 and 1980); John Treacy (that silver in 1984) and Kenneth Egan (silver in 2008. All of them spoke about the pride of representing their country, of wearing their green kit. I spoke to traveller Francie Barrett about his pride as an Irishman in carrying his country’s flag in the opening ceremony at the Atlanta Olympics. Their predecessors were denied the opportunity by the politics of the time, forced instead to be recognised as British or American, just so they could compete. But they were proud to be Irish and deserve to be recognised as such, and as winners too.
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  #13  
Old 25-07-2012, 09:39 PM
an liathroid beag an liathroid beag is offline
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Am very interested in Athletics and was aware of Sheridan--all Olympic golds in the Hammer up to Amsterdam in 1932 were won by Irishmen usually throwing for the US or GB--there is a story that the Germans invited Pat O Callaghan to Germany prior to the 1936 Olympics to study his technique---Pity that O Callaghan was not allowed to compete in Berlin in 1936 as he was at his peak then, the best in the world and would have won his third gold.

Seven Gold Olympic Hammer medals have been won by Irishmen a feat only equalled by the Russians --Irishmen also made a clean sweep of the hammer medals in 1908 only repeated by Russia.---a great tradition in sport which has been probably been damaged by the rise of the GAA.
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Last edited by an liathroid beag; 25-07-2012 at 10:00 PM..
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  #14  
Old 25-07-2012, 10:19 PM
rebelman rebelman is offline
 
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Originally Posted by an liathroid beag View Post
Am very interested in Athletics and was aware of Sheridan--all Olympic golds in the Hammer up to Amsterdam in 1932 were won by Irishmen usually throwing for the US or GB--there is a story that the Germans invited Pat O Callaghan to Germany prior to the 1936 Olympics to study his technique---Pity that O Callaghan was not allowed to compete in Berlin in 1936 as he was at his peak then, the best in the world and would have won his third gold.

Seven Gold Olympic Hammer medals have been won by Irishmen a feat only equalled by the Russians --Irishmen also made a clean sweep of the hammer medals in 1908 only repeated by Russia.---a great tradition in sport which has been probably been damaged by the rise of the GAA.
He was from just outside kanturk.
Id be from north cork aera.
Hes a legend.
Theres a statue in banteer of him.
He used to cycle over 20 miles daily go school in patrican academy mallow.

He used to use the steel off gates to train.

He in 1932 was nearly robbed by he own officals when he had the wrong shoes .....as they never told him the surface was changed.

He had spikes and coudnt grip and was on the verge goung out.

No help from he own...he got a hacksaw...cut the spikes off and win gold.

Heroic stuff and not only did he beat the worlds best.....but he had to beat he own too.

Irish health service refused to pay him for months he was off training...he had to pay that him.self...year later he got it back only when he win gold.


Even in the article their it didnt really show what he achieved.typical dublin paper hesistant to gave him credit he deserverd.

Ireland has just 4 track field golds...he has 2.


He is our greatest athlete ever....coughlan the media golden boy not a patch in him.
Twas pat son said if youre born in dublin your born with a silver spoon in your mouth.
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  #15  
Old 25-07-2012, 10:53 PM
o_2_b_a_rebel o_2_b_a_rebel is offline
 
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its women's boxing, like. I mean how many are even involved in the sport?
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  #16  
Old 25-07-2012, 11:00 PM
an liathroid beag an liathroid beag is offline
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Originally Posted by rebelman View Post
He was from just outside kanturk.
Id be from north cork aera.
Hes a legend.
Theres a statue in banteer of him.
He used to cycle over 20 miles daily go school in patrican academy mallow.

He used to use the steel off gates to train.

He in 1932 was nearly robbed by he own officals when he had the wrong shoes .....as they never told him the surface was changed.

He had spikes and coudnt grip and was on the verge goung out.

No help from he own...he got a hacksaw...cut the spikes off and win gold.

Heroic stuff and not only did he beat the worlds best.....but he had to beat he own too.

Irish health service refused to pay him for months he was off training...he had to pay that him.self...year later he got it back only when he win gold.


Even in the article their it didnt really show what he achieved.typical dublin paper hesistant to gave him credit he deserverd.

Ireland has just 4 track field golds...he has 2.


He is our greatest athlete ever....coughlan the media golden boy not a patch in him.
Twas pat son said if youre born in dublin your born with a silver spoon in your mouth.


1928 Olympic Games

In the summer of 1928 the three O’Callaghan brothers paid their own fares when travelling to the Olympic Games in Amsterdam. Even though Con O’Callaghan was taking part in the decathlon it was his younger brother who became the hero. O’Callaghan was still regarded as a novice when he represented his country in the Olympic Games and it was expected that he wouldn’t do much. In spite of this he finished in sixth place in the preliminary round and started the final with a throw of 155’ 9”. This put him in third place. He was behind Oissian Skoeld of Sweden but ahead of Malcolm Nokes, the favourite from Great Britain. For his second throw O’Callaghan, a master of the psychological element of competition, used the Swede’s own hammer and recorded a throw of 168’ 7”. It was 4’ more than what Skoeld could manage and it resulted in a first gold medal for O’Callaghan and for Ireland. The podium presentation was particularly emotional as it was the first time that the Irish tricolour was raised and it was the first time that Amhrán na bhFiann was played.

Success in Ireland

After returning from the Olympic Games O’Callaghan cemented his reputation as a great athlete by having much more success on the field between 1929 and 1932. In the national championships of 1930 he won the hammer, shot-putt, 56lbs without follow, 56lbs over-the-bar, discus and high jump. These were only a handful of titles that O’Callaghan won during this era.

In the summer of 1930 O’Callaghan took part in a two-day invitation event in Stockholm where Oissian Skoeld was confidently expected to gain revenge on the Irishman for the defeat in Amsterdam. On the first day of the competition Skoeld broke his own European record with his very first throw. O’Callaghan followed immediately and overtook him with his own first throw and breaking the new record. On the second day of the event both O’Callaghan and Skoeld were neck-and-neck, when the former, with his last throw, set a new European record of 178’ 8” to win. O’Callaghan had confirmed that his Olympic success was not a flash in the pan.

1932 Summer Olympics

By the time the 1932 Summer Olympics came around O’Callaghan was regularly throwing the hammer over 170 feet. The Irish team were much better organised on that occasion and the whole journey to Los Angeles was funded by a church-gate collection. Shortly before departing on the 6,000-mile boat and train journey across the Atlantic O’Callaghan collected a fifth hammer title at the national championships.

On arrival in Los Angeles O’Callaghan’s preparations of the defence of his title came unstuck. The surface of the hammer circle had always been of grass or clay and throwers wore field shoes with steel spikes set into the heel and sole for grip. In Los Angeles, however, a cinder surface was to be provided. For some unexplained reason the Olympic Committee of Ireland had failed to notify O’Callaghan of this change. Consequently he came to the arena with three pairs of spiked shoes for a grass or clay surface and time did not permit a change of shoe. He wore his shortest spikes but found that the spikes caught in the hard gritty slab and impeded his crucial third turn. In spite of being severely impeded he managed to qualify for the final stage of the competition with a spectacular all-or-nothing third throw of 171’ 3”. While the final of the 400m hurdles was delayed O’Callaghan hunted down a hacksaw and a file in the groundskeeper's shack and he cut off the spikes. The result was less than ideal but it promised a much surer footing. O’Callaghan’s first throw was short of his earlier mark but he was satisfied with his footwear. His second throw reached a distance of 176’ 11”, a result which allowed him to retain his Olympic title. It was Ireland’s second gold medal of the day as Bob Tisdall had earlier won a gold medal in the 400m hurdles

He threw the hammer seven feet beyond the world record in 1937 but it was never ratified as a world record because it was under NACAI rules--truly Irelands greatest ever athlete
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  #17  
Old 25-07-2012, 11:05 PM
The Curious Lozenge The Curious Lozenge is offline
 
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she's a good girl.
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When did Italy become a Latin country?
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it's about time they made this similar to the 7s and broth in a bowl, plate, shield to give teams more gams.
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  #18  
Old 25-07-2012, 11:09 PM
an liathroid beag an liathroid beag is offline
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its women's boxing, like. I mean how many are even involved in the sport?




Still on the Steroids O 2 b ?
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  #19  
Old 25-07-2012, 11:22 PM
rebelman rebelman is offline
 
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Originally Posted by an liathroid beag View Post
1928 Olympic Games

In the summer of 1928 the three O’Callaghan brothers paid their own fares when travelling to the Olympic Games in Amsterdam. Even though Con O’Callaghan was taking part in the decathlon it was his younger brother who became the hero. O’Callaghan was still regarded as a novice when he represented his country in the Olympic Games and it was expected that he wouldn’t do much. In spite of this he finished in sixth place in the preliminary round and started the final with a throw of 155’ 9”. This put him in third place. He was behind Oissian Skoeld of Sweden but ahead of Malcolm Nokes, the favourite from Great Britain. For his second throw O’Callaghan, a master of the psychological element of competition, used the Swede’s own hammer and recorded a throw of 168’ 7”. It was 4’ more than what Skoeld could manage and it resulted in a first gold medal for O’Callaghan and for Ireland. The podium presentation was particularly emotional as it was the first time that the Irish tricolour was raised and it was the first time that Amhrán na bhFiann was played.

Success in Ireland

After returning from the Olympic Games O’Callaghan cemented his reputation as a great athlete by having much more success on the field between 1929 and 1932. In the national championships of 1930 he won the hammer, shot-putt, 56lbs without follow, 56lbs over-the-bar, discus and high jump. These were only a handful of titles that O’Callaghan won during this era.

In the summer of 1930 O’Callaghan took part in a two-day invitation event in Stockholm where Oissian Skoeld was confidently expected to gain revenge on the Irishman for the defeat in Amsterdam. On the first day of the competition Skoeld broke his own European record with his very first throw. O’Callaghan followed immediately and overtook him with his own first throw and breaking the new record. On the second day of the event both O’Callaghan and Skoeld were neck-and-neck, when the former, with his last throw, set a new European record of 178’ 8” to win. O’Callaghan had confirmed that his Olympic success was not a flash in the pan.

1932 Summer Olympics

By the time the 1932 Summer Olympics came around O’Callaghan was regularly throwing the hammer over 170 feet. The Irish team were much better organised on that occasion and the whole journey to Los Angeles was funded by a church-gate collection. Shortly before departing on the 6,000-mile boat and train journey across the Atlantic O’Callaghan collected a fifth hammer title at the national championships.

On arrival in Los Angeles O’Callaghan’s preparations of the defence of his title came unstuck. The surface of the hammer circle had always been of grass or clay and throwers wore field shoes with steel spikes set into the heel and sole for grip. In Los Angeles, however, a cinder surface was to be provided. For some unexplained reason the Olympic Committee of Ireland had failed to notify O’Callaghan of this change. Consequently he came to the arena with three pairs of spiked shoes for a grass or clay surface and time did not permit a change of shoe. He wore his shortest spikes but found that the spikes caught in the hard gritty slab and impeded his crucial third turn. In spite of being severely impeded he managed to qualify for the final stage of the competition with a spectacular all-or-nothing third throw of 171’ 3”. While the final of the 400m hurdles was delayed O’Callaghan hunted down a hacksaw and a file in the groundskeeper's shack and he cut off the spikes. The result was less than ideal but it promised a much surer footing. O’Callaghan’s first throw was short of his earlier mark but he was satisfied with his footwear. His second throw reached a distance of 176’ 11”, a result which allowed him to retain his Olympic title. It was Ireland’s second gold medal of the day as Bob Tisdall had earlier won a gold medal in the 400m hurdles

He threw the hammer seven feet beyond the world record in 1937 but it was never ratified as a world because it was under NACAI rules--truly Irelands greatest ever athlete
Tear jerking lad....riveting stuff ...stuff films are made from.

Eammon coughlan the dubs would try and tell you he is the best ever.

No way pedro.

He allowed a 40 year old new zealander walker beat him for the medal.


Hes our greatesest athlete without a shadow of a doubt.

No bullshit...just courage..conviction. ..belief and skill and as the great lord mayor cork on hunger strike once said...its not those thay inflict the most but rather those that endure the most succeed.
He was one of them.
Their was no glory hunting from him.
Some sportspeople are all "fur coat no knickers ...all talk no success to back it up.

Not Dr.Pat.
A legend.
Katie taylor i wish her the best...she a true irish heroine from wicklow and doing ireland proud.
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  #20  
Old 26-07-2012, 09:32 AM
POL POL is offline
 
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i find womens boxing offensive
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I think Rooney has the potential to be a great midfield player
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