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  #41  
Old 13-01-2020, 02:02 PM
Donald Trump Donald Trump is offline
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  #42  
Old 13-01-2020, 02:04 PM
Choice is yours Choice is yours is offline
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  #43  
Old 13-01-2020, 03:29 PM
westieboyo westieboyo is offline
 
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Nope

There is a facility for Irish, it's just not a stand alone Act. Have you heard Ulster-Scots Even some unionists have admitted nobody in the unionist community (outside of Ballymena) cares about it.

There's enough in the bill to try get it working in the round. Let's at least try.
Wasn't a stand alone Irish Language Act a red line for SF?

As was no Arlene Foster as First Minister?
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  #44  
Old 13-01-2020, 03:46 PM
SoundMan SoundMan is offline
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Wasn't a stand alone Irish Language Act a red line for SF?

As was no Arlene Foster as First Minister?
"Legislation to create a Commissioner to recognise, support, protect and
enhance the development of the Irish language in Northern Ireland and to
provide official recognition of the status of the Irish Language in Northern
Ireland. The legislation will also repeal the Administration of Justice
(Language) Act (Ireland) 1737."

"The main function of the Irish Language Commissioner will be to protect and
enhance the development of the use of the Irish language by public
authorities including by providing advice and guidance, and introducing,
supporting and monitoring the use of best practice language standards."

"The Assembly’s Standing Orders will also be amended to allow any person
to conduct their business before the Assembly or an Assembly Committee
through Irish or Ulster Scots."

"This legislation - including establishing the Office and both Commissioners -
will be established as new dedicated parts of the Northern Ireland Act 1998.
This is the legislation which implements the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement
and subsequent agreements and establishes the Assembly and Executive in
law. The enactment of these new Parts of the Northern Ireland Act will reflect
the importance of these issues to people and society in Northern Ireland."

I think these go a long way to address the concerns regarding dignity and respect for the use of Irish in the north. As previously said most folk who speak English will have absolutely no difficulty in understanding Ulster-Scots which is little more than speaking with an accent and using a few colloquialisms from what I've seen and heard. Can't see it have the same impact as Irish to be honest.

As for working with Arlene, the responsibility between the MLAs and their SPADs in this latest agreement should hopefully ensure that there's never a repeat of the Cash For Ash scandal. It'll be interesting to see when the judicial report on that is finally published by the way.
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  #45  
Old 13-01-2020, 04:36 PM
westieboyo westieboyo is offline
 
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Originally Posted by SoundMan View Post
"Legislation to create a Commissioner to recognise, support, protect and
enhance the development of the Irish language in Northern Ireland and to
provide official recognition of the status of the Irish Language in Northern
Ireland. The legislation will also repeal the Administration of Justice
(Language) Act (Ireland) 1737."

"The main function of the Irish Language Commissioner will be to protect and
enhance the development of the use of the Irish language by public
authorities including by providing advice and guidance, and introducing,
supporting and monitoring the use of best practice language standards."

"The Assembly’s Standing Orders will also be amended to allow any person
to conduct their business before the Assembly or an Assembly Committee
through Irish or Ulster Scots."

"This legislation - including establishing the Office and both Commissioners -
will be established as new dedicated parts of the Northern Ireland Act 1998.
This is the legislation which implements the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement
and subsequent agreements and establishes the Assembly and Executive in
law. The enactment of these new Parts of the Northern Ireland Act will reflect
the importance of these issues to people and society in Northern Ireland."

I think these go a long way to address the concerns regarding dignity and respect for the use of Irish in the north. As previously said most folk who speak English will have absolutely no difficulty in understanding Ulster-Scots which is little more than speaking with an accent and using a few colloquialisms from what I've seen and heard. Can't see it have the same impact as Irish to be honest.

As for working with Arlene, the responsibility between the MLAs and their SPADs in this latest agreement should hopefully ensure that there's never a repeat of the Cash For Ash scandal. It'll be interesting to see when the judicial report on that is finally published by the way.
So no stand alone Irish Act. Exactly what Gregory Campbell predicted.
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  #46  
Old 13-01-2020, 04:41 PM
SoundMan SoundMan is offline
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So no stand alone Irish Act. Exactly what Gregory Campbell predicted.
That's fine. Is Gregory Campbell happy with what has been agreed? Jim Allister was talking about lots and lots of Campbell soup
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  #47  
Old 13-01-2020, 04:53 PM
jimmym jimmym is offline
 
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Originally Posted by westieboyo View Post
So no stand alone Irish Act. Exactly what Gregory Campbell predicted.
Either way the public will not forgive either party if they had not agreed to the
deal, both parties know this, so both will spin it as some form of victory,
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  #48  
Old 13-01-2020, 05:01 PM
SoundMan SoundMan is offline
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Originally Posted by jimmym View Post
Either way the public will not forgive either party if they had not agreed to the
deal, both parties know this, so both will spin it as some form of victory,
Not sure it's being spun as a victory jimmy. It's a pragmatic step to take in that most of the concerns previously raised have been addressed.
Not to complete satisfaction I grant you but certainly enough to get back around the table and get things running so that improvements can in time be made on the areas of concern that haven't fully been addressed.

It's not necessarily a one side wins and the other side loses type scenario either.

People are people and most folk share many of the same concerns and just want Stormont back running and trying to restore a degree of normality on the ground. Hopefully the new deal will have had enough time to take proper root before the f**ken Marching Season starts again
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  #49  
Old 13-01-2020, 08:27 PM
BBJ BBJ is offline
 
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Originally Posted by SoundMan View Post
Nope

Have you heard Ulster-Scots Even some unionists have admitted nobody in the unionist community (outside of Ballymena) cares about it.
I'm well up with it myself as my late grandmother came from a village called Dunloy, not too far from Ballymena.
It's not politically correct a lot of the time. For example, the term for a disabled child is "a wee daftie".
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  #50  
Old 14-01-2020, 10:20 AM
SoundMan SoundMan is offline
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I'm well up with it myself as my late grandmother came from a village called Dunloy, not too far from Ballymena.
It's not politically correct a lot of the time. For example, the term for a disabled child is "a wee daftie".
From what I've heard/read of Ulster-Scots it relies heavily on Scottish slang spoken with a norn iron accent and anyone who's spent time in Scotland or around Scots could more than hold their own speaking that "language", especially if you throw in the occasional Bai, or Hai.

Words like bairns (young children) weans (wee 'uns, young children) folk, lassie, coo, doon. etc

That said I always thought a wee daftie was a someone who was daft/silly/stupid rather than disabled.

Have a look at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fj4w6SCn2ZM

and see just how multi-lingual you are
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