tempobet tipobet Instagram Profiles
Ireland and the EU - Peoples Republic Of Cork Discussion Forums

Go Back   Peoples Republic Of Cork Discussion Forums > PROC Forums > Current & Local Affairs Forum
User Name
Password
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 29-07-2020, 08:31 AM
zap zap is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 3,104
Default Ireland and the EU

Pay up: Ireland will pay vastly more into new EU budget than it gets back



The report on this morning’s EU recovery deal in the Irish Times is very comprehensive, reporting all of the issues in detail, except for one, which is, very strangely, totally left out of the coverage:
The 27 member states of the European Union this morning signed off on a €1.8 trillion package to fund the next seven years of spending and inject funds into struggling economies to help them weather the devastation of the Coronavirus pandemic.
The summit was one of the longest ever, and leaders negotiated through the night once again on Monday before announcing a deal had been reached at 5.30am on Tuesday.
“It has been a very challenging number of days negotiating this package but it has been worthwhile. The solidarity displayed throughout this summit is something that I think will stand Europe in good stead into the future,” Taoiseach Micheál Martin said after the deal was clinched.
Nowhere in Naomi O’Reilly’s report, for some reason, will you read that Ireland will contribute vastly more to the seven-year EU budget (which is separate to the recovery fund) than we get back. In fact, according to a German MEP who has the official figures, Ireland will contribute almost €16billion more than it receives: (there goes the Apple money due to Ireland)


Only four countries – Sweden, France, Germany, and Holland – are paying in more than Ireland is.
Indeed, when asked about this, Thomas Byrne, Minister for Europe, didn’t seem to demur:
“It is true that we will pay in more than we receive, but that does reflect our strong economic growth, and the Single Market participation. That’s a huge benefit to the economy, for social, environmental, financial terms it’s been absolutely massive. It is difficult to estimate how much we will contribute, but it will be substantial but we will be gaining and back from the EU budget itself in terms of direct grants, in terms of loans.”
Interestingly, by objecting to this mammoth budget, the so-called “frugal” countries, Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Austria, and Sweden, have all secured rebates on their contributions to the EU budget, as can be seen in the (typically inpenetrable) document itself:
For the period 2021-2027, lump-sum corrections will reduce the annual GNI-based contribution of Denmark, the Netherlands, Austria and Sweden, and in the context of the support for the recovery and resilience, as well as of Germany. The Member States concerned shall benefit from a gross reduction in their annual Gross National Income-based contribution in 2020 prices of:
  • Denmark: EUR 377 million;
  • Germany: EUR 3 671 million;
  • The Netherlands: EUR 1 921 million;
  • Austria: EUR 565 million;
  • Sweden: EUR 1 069 million.
Ireland did not object, or seek a rebate, so we’re on the hook for the full amount, while the Germans get themselves a nice discount.
Pro-European voices (basically the entire media, political, and business establishments in Ireland) will, of course, try to obfuscate this issue by pointing out all the funding Ireland is likely to receive from the EU in the coming years – but here’s the thing: If you add up all that funding, we’re still going to be paying out billions more than we get back. In fact, if Dr. Beck’s figures are to be believed above (and there’s no reason to disbelieve him unless your policy is to disbelieve him simply because he is a eurosceptic, though that will be reason enough for some people) then Ireland will be contributing as much to the EU over the next few years as we spend on healthcare in a single year.


https://gript.ie/ireland-eu-budget-c...tion-going-up/
__________________
http://qr.kaywa.com/?s=8&d=zap
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 29-07-2020, 09:55 AM
KarHen KarHen is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 9
Default

will Ireland still have "strong economic growth" after the pandemic?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 29-07-2020, 12:03 PM
Drucker Drucker is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 17,448
Default

I'm sure John McGuirk will use the same arguments about people in Dublin being "net contributors" to the local property tax base while people in Leitrim are "net beneficiaries."

Just like people in Skehard Road are "net contributors," while people in Mahon are "net beneficiaries."

You can make that "argument" about any funding.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 29-07-2020, 12:18 PM
Drucker Drucker is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 17,448
Default

By the way, for those who spend way too much time reading "Oirish" editions of UK newspapers, or listening to British "news" channels, and of course Murdoch's 96FM, here are some figures on where our exports go that might be of interest:

The value of goods exports from January to May 2020 was €67,702m; a 6% rise in the same period last year.

There was a hike in the export of medical and pharmaceutical products to 44% or €5,203m accounting for 40% of the total exports for the month of May.

The export of organic chemicals was down 21% to €774m while the export of professional, scientific and controlling apparatus fell to €189m, 29% less than the same month last year.

Of the goods exported 9% went to Britain while 38% went to the EU market, a decrease of 8% for the same period last year.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump







PROC Gig Guide
EVENT GUIDE - HIGHLIGHT
Inhaler
Cyprus Avenue, Caroline St.

Tuesday 6th October @ 7:30 pm



All times are GMT. The time now is 10:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All forum comments are the sole responsibility and property of forum users. PeoplesRepublicOfCork.com and its sponsors disclaim all liability for content posted by users of the forum. PeoplesRepublicOfCork.com and its sponsors do not necessarily share the views expressed in this forum. Use the report post system to have comments considered for edit or deletion. All users are IP logged. Website hosted by Hostrocket USA.