Go Back   Peoples Republic Of Cork Discussion Forums > Sports Forum
User Name
Password
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 15-11-2007, 02:04 PM
Edmund Blackwater Edmund Blackwater is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 6,682
Default A game for scumbags, played by animals

is how Lamps, rather incisively, termed rogby.

Quote:
A RUGBY player was jailed for 15 months yesterday for stamping on the head of an opponent during a match.
Rhys Garfield, 22, of Pontycymmer, near Bridgend, caused a 10cm wound which resulted in 21-year-old Gareth Howells needing 30 stitches in his head when playing for his village at Glynneath on December 10, 2005.
Officials last night warned players who seriously transgressed rugby’s laws could face sanctions both inside and outside the game.
Swansea Crown Court had earlier heard that Mr Howells was playing second row for Glynneath while Garfield was Pontycymmer’s number eight.
Garfield was seen to deliberately stamp on Mr Howells’s head in a ruck which formed after a lineout went to ground.
He was found guilty of unlawful wounding by a jury who cleared him of the more serious charge of wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm.
Andrew Davies, defending, described Mr Howells’s permanent injuries as “cosmetic” and said he had returned to playing the game.
Mr Davies asked the judge to consider a suspended sentence, saying Garfield had led an otherwise blameless life.
“Rhys Garfield is a young man of considerable ability. He’s a talented sportsman who had attracted the attention of regional rugby teams,” he said.
But Recorder Gareth Jones at Swansea Crown Court rejected the plea, jailing Garfield after telling him his behaviour was “wholly unacceptable”. After the verdict last month, Mr Howells gave a brief interview and explained his decision to press charges.
“I did not want the same thing to happen to another player, and the verdict goes to show you cannot get away with that sort of thing,” he said.
“I have had plenty of knocks, but this was something else. I know people can overstep the line in rugby and become aggressive, but this was beyond that. I did not want this person to get away with that.”
Last night, Nigel Whitehouse, an experienced international referee who is also a police inspector based in Bonymaen, Swansea, said violent players should be subject to criminal sanctions in certain circumstances but, as the law stands, the injured party would have to make a complaint to the police.
“Rugby is an aggressive and physical game but players know it has to be controlled and if they step over the mark then, depending on the seriousness, they have to realise that court cases could be pending,” said Mr Whitehouse, who once turned down an offer from the International Rugby Board to become a full-time referee to continue his career in South Wales Police.
“I do not see why anyone should go on the field and be subjected to any sort of violence outside the laws of rugby,” he added.
“At the lower levels people have to go to work on Monday morning and at the top level, the game is their livelihood.
“At no stage do I condone violence on the rugby field. It has to be played within the laws laid down and if anyone steps outside those it may be dealt with by a six-week ban or in a court.”
Mr Whitehouse said such instances were rare among the 4,500 games to which the WRU appoints referees each year, which generated around 300 sendings off.
But a report into rugby at under-19 level and younger released by the WRU showed violence remained a problem in the game’s lower echelons, with youth matches abandoned and some cases referred to the police.
http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/news/...1466-20098886/

Whatever doubt there was to the veracity of his claims has surely dissipated.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 15-11-2007, 02:14 PM
Rebel Yell Rebel Yell is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Between a rock and a hard place
Posts: 7,758
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Edmund Blackwater View Post
is how Lamps, rather incisively, termed rogby.



http://icwales.icnetwork.co.uk/news/...1466-20098886/

Whatever doubt there was to the veracity of his claims has surely dissipated.
But it's the game of the people in Wales you see and,as the SFI will no doubt clarify, bears no resemblance to the upper middle class game that is the preserve of doctors, lawyers, and other professional men of fine standing and breeding here in Arland
__________________
Work is the curse of the drinking class.

Ambassador to Spain...yariba yariba!!!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:03 AM
Rebelred Rebelred is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Corcaigh
Posts: 38,162
Default

http://www.rte.ie/sport/rugby/2008/1001/bestn.html


Best hit with massive 18 week ban
Wednesday, 1 October 2008 10:49

Northampton forward Neil Best has been banned for 18 weeks by the RFU after admitting illegally making contact with the eye or eye area of Wasps' James Haskell with his hand during a Guinness Premiership game.

Best, capped 18 times by Ireland and a member of their 2007 World Cup squad, appeared before a three-man panel chaired by the RFU's disciplinary officer His Honour Judge Jeff Blackett.

Best had been cited by Premiership citing officer Ken Pattinson following Saints' 24-20 victory over Wasps at Franklin's Gardens.

Haskell gave evidence before the panel, confirming his written statement made after the game that the player (Best) 'gratuitously commenced to gouge at (his) eye with increasing intensity'.

Haskell, a contender to captain England in their autumn Tests next month, said his vision became increasingly blurred, he suffered excruciating pain and felt physically sick because of soreness.

He was later taken to Northampton General Hospital, where an ophthalmologist diagnosed a corneal abrasion and prescribed antibiotic drops.

Photographs taken a day after the game showed significant swelling around Haskell's eye, which was closed and bruised, with a one-centimetre scratch on his upper eyelid.

Best, whose Northampton team-mate Dylan Hartley received a six-month suspension for eye-gouging last year, told the panel he had acted recklessly, and not deliberately.

The panel said it accepted Best had not intentionally searched for Haskell's eye and did not intend to inflict serious injury, but he had tried to grab somewhere on his head to pull him up and backwards.

But they did not agree with Best's account that contact with the eye was 'fleeting'.

Best, 29, joined Northampton from Ulster this summer. During a professional career of more than 150 games he had never previously been cited.

In their written judgement, the panel said: 'The nature of the player's actions was grave.

'Placing fingers in and around opponents' eyes constitutes one of the most serious offences in the game because of the risk of permanent career-ending damage.

'Contact was clearly painful and caused significant injury, continuing distress and some mental anguish to Haskell, who initially feared first for his sight and subsequently that he may not be able to play again.'

After imposing an 18-week ban, the panel added: 'In reaching this conclusion, the panel has taken into consideration the fact that this offence was entirely out of character and will be a significant blemish on his (Best's) record.

'We also took into account the damaging effect this will have on the player's club and international playing career, and the risk that he will suffer financial loss.'
__________________
Rogby Football explained
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:07 AM
Arcadia Arcadia is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,168
Default

The Dockers and Binmen of Limerick will love that.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:08 AM
POL POL is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Senior Analysis
Posts: 42,524
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebelred View Post
http://www.rte.ie/sport/rugby/2008/1001/bestn.html


Best hit with massive 18 week ban
Wednesday, 1 October 2008 10:49

Northampton forward Neil Best has been banned for 18 weeks by the RFU after admitting illegally making contact with the eye or eye area of Wasps' James Haskell with his hand during a Guinness Premiership game.

Best, capped 18 times by Ireland and a member of their 2007 World Cup squad, appeared before a three-man panel chaired by the RFU's disciplinary officer His Honour Judge Jeff Blackett.

Best had been cited by Premiership citing officer Ken Pattinson following Saints' 24-20 victory over Wasps at Franklin's Gardens.

Haskell gave evidence before the panel, confirming his written statement made after the game that the player (Best) 'gratuitously commenced to gouge at (his) eye with increasing intensity'.

Haskell, a contender to captain England in their autumn Tests next month, said his vision became increasingly blurred, he suffered excruciating pain and felt physically sick because of soreness.

He was later taken to Northampton General Hospital, where an ophthalmologist diagnosed a corneal abrasion and prescribed antibiotic drops.

Photographs taken a day after the game showed significant swelling around Haskell's eye, which was closed and bruised, with a one-centimetre scratch on his upper eyelid.

Best, whose Northampton team-mate Dylan Hartley received a six-month suspension for eye-gouging last year, told the panel he had acted recklessly, and not deliberately.

The panel said it accepted Best had not intentionally searched for Haskell's eye and did not intend to inflict serious injury, but he had tried to grab somewhere on his head to pull him up and backwards.

But they did not agree with Best's account that contact with the eye was 'fleeting'.

Best, 29, joined Northampton from Ulster this summer. During a professional career of more than 150 games he had never previously been cited.

In their written judgement, the panel said: 'The nature of the player's actions was grave.

'Placing fingers in and around opponents' eyes constitutes one of the most serious offences in the game because of the risk of permanent career-ending damage.

'Contact was clearly painful and caused significant injury, continuing distress and some mental anguish to Haskell, who initially feared first for his sight and subsequently that he may not be able to play again.'

After imposing an 18-week ban, the panel added: 'In reaching this conclusion, the panel has taken into consideration the fact that this offence was entirely out of character and will be a significant blemish on his (Best's) record.

'We also took into account the damaging effect this will have on the player's club and international playing career, and the risk that he will suffer financial loss.'
only handbags sure, and the most important thing is they went for dinner afterwards
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by KD Langer View Post

I think Rooney has the potential to be a great midfield player
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:09 AM
Eoin Eoin is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Dublin
Posts: 30,132
Default

There's dirty play in any competitive sport.

Rugby is no different.

I'm not excusing what these lads have done btw.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:30 AM
RonnyB RonnyB is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,163
Default

And what does Jerry Flannery get for stamping on a fellas head? 1 measly month. Didnt Sean Og get that for dragging someone to ground? And we think the GAA system of discipline is all over the place...
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Actin The Sham View Post
Cork first, fuck everything else.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:35 AM
HappyMonday83 HappyMonday83 is offline
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: I'll never talk.
Posts: 26,376
Default

It was only last weekend in our match against kilrush the our no. 12 got his face stamped on while out hooker had his eye gouged. Outside of that several players got the usual few pucks and slaps. A right dirty shower of knackers so they were.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:38 AM
Arcadia Arcadia is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 2,168
Post

This year we saw the culmination of years of the authorities looking the other way, in either framing or policing rules
Michael Clifford

Kerry's Killian Young tussles with Ryan McMenamin of Tyrone in last Sunday's All Ireland football final At around 4.55pm last Sunday, the final whistle blew. A mass of red and white spread out across the Croke Park turf like a running dye. The Gaelic football championship for 2008 was at an end. Tyrone won in a fine game, but irrespective of who lifted Sam Maguire, football was the loser this year.

The depths plumbed in some of the behaviour on football fields was a long time coming. Just as the bonfire of international finance was smouldering for some years before catching flame. And just as national politics was waiting a few years to throw up Declan Ganley, who represents a throwback to a time when democracy was exclusively the plaything of rich men.


There is a common theme here. Rules are made to ensure that participants in the game – football, finance, politics – are curbed from losing the run of their natural instincts.

The rules ostensibly take account of the foibles of man. Without these rules, football could degenerate into violence, financial markets into wholesale fraud and politics into a game exclusively concerned with money. The will to win must be tempered, greed must be corralled, the pursuit of power must be trammelled. So goes the theory.


In reality, rules are only as good as the will of those who make them. And this year rules were tested, bent and broken while regulators and referees looked the other way.


Gaelic football is a great game when played properly. The GAA's amateur ethos is supposed to include an element of sportsmanship, free of cynicism that pervades professional sport.

This year we saw the culmination of years of the authorities looking the other way, in either framing or policing rules. Tactical fouling is rampant. Verbal abuse, goading, bordering on the violent, can now be seen on any given Sunday. The tactic of attempting to get an opponent sent off has crept across the Irish Sea. Winning at any cost except being caught is all that matters.

As Kieran Shannon wrote on these pages four weeks ago, in an excellent piece of analysis: "The GAA is run by a crowd of Rip Van Winkles. They don't see how the game has changed, that it pays to cheat, that teams are deliberately fouling on the field; feigning injury to kill the game; tugging at an opponent after giving away a free because it's worth it."
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-10-2008, 11:42 AM
raZor raZor is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Edin-brrrrrr
Posts: 7,420
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyMonday83 View Post
It was only last weekend in our match against kilrush the our no. 12 got his face stamped on while out hooker had his eye gouged. Outside of that several players got the usual few pucks and slaps. A right dirty shower of knackers so they were.
The country teams are always dodgy to play against. This type of play generally happens alot more in junior levels than at the top, the same can be said for most sports I'd say though. I remember playing against some team and their second rows were trying to pull the legs from under our props in scrums.

Best should deem himself fortunate that it's only 18 weeks, any photos of your man's eye?
__________________
I was saying Boourns.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump










All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All forum comments are the sole responsibility and property of forum users. PeoplesRepublicOfCork.com and its sponsors disclaim all liability for content posted by users of the forum. PeoplesRepublicOfCork.com and its sponsors do not necessarily share the views expressed in this forum. Use the report post system to have comments considered for edit or deletion. All users are IP logged. Website hosted by Hostrocket USA.