Go Back   Peoples Republic Of Cork Discussion Forums > Current & Local Affairs Forum
User Name
Password
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #71  
Old 05-11-2013, 07:24 PM
westieboyo westieboyo is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 6,379
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by strict66 View Post
As the saying goes , how do you tell a socialist from a capitalist - simple just stand them in front of a mansion. A socialist well tell you no one should live in a house like that and a capitalist will tell you everyone should.
....and if you were Tony and Cherie they would say "We want another 6 just like that".
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 06-11-2013, 09:43 AM
an liathroid beag an liathroid beag is offline
Senior PROC Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 13,899
Default

The Disappeared - Adams can help bring closure
Wednesday, November 06, 2013
Anyone watching Monday night’s RTÉ 1 documentary on the Disappeared could not fail to be moved by the testimony of the families of those abducted and murdered by the IRA during the 1970s.
Jean McConville whose story featured in the Disappeared on RTÉ.Jean McConville whose story featured in the Disappeared on RTÉ.
For some, while their loved ones are dead, the dreaded memory of that time remains very much alive.

An old pair of blue and white striped trainers were the first sign that the family of 22-year-old Brian McKinney found of him. He disappeared from Andersonstown in Belfast in May 1978 — abducted, bound, dragged to his freshly dug grave and executed with a bullet to the back of his head for his part in the robbery of £70 from an IRA-run social club. It made no difference that, days earlier, Brian’s mother, Margaret, had repaid the money. It took another 21 years before the IRA admitted to his murder and revealed the location of his grave in Co Monaghan.

Kathleen Armstrong’s husband Charlie was disappeared in Aug 1981 on his way to taking an elderly neighbour to Mass. She walked the roads of south Armagh every Sunday for almost 30 years searching for him. The IRA never admitted responsibility, but his remains were eventually found in 2010.

John Garland discovered Jean McConville’s body while walking along Shelling Hill beach in Co Louth, after spotting something sticking out of the sand. When he realised it was human remains, he ran to the car for holy water to bless the body and he said a prayer. McConville, a widowed mother of 10, had been abducted in 1972 but only confirmed dead in 2003.

These are just some of the heartbreaking accounts of some of the darkest days of the Troubles.

For most of us on this island, the worst is over. The Anglo-Irish Agreement of 1985 provided a blueprint for peace that was followed by an IRA ceasefire and finally a cessation of violence.

But for many people — both north and south of the border — peace is not enough. They need to close a painful chapter in their lives. While some of the families have had their agony lessened by the discovery of their loved ones, others are still missing.

So, who is likely to know where they are buried? According to a constituency colleague, Sinn Féin president Gerry Adams is the one man with influence over those with knowledge of these killings.

Gerald Nash, Labour Party TD for Louth, has launched a broadside against his constituency colleague. Coincidentally, Nash embarks today on a trip north to meet with the families of the Disappeared.

“He has it within his capability to help these families,” says Nash. “His immediate tweet in response to the programme, where he appealed for anyone with information to contact either relevant authorities or himself, was pathetic and an affront to decency.”

It is hard to argue with that, particularly as the attitude of Adams contrasts so much with that of Martin McGuinness who has described the IRA’s secret killing and burying of victims as “cruel and unjustified”. McGuinness has never denied being in the IRA. Adams has done so for 30 years.

Who is the more believable?
__________________
A woman drove me to drink!-and I forgot to thank her!
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 06-11-2013, 09:50 AM
Smeggle Smeggle is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: west cork
Posts: 10,130
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by an liathroid beag View Post
The Disappeared - Adams can help bring closure
Wednesday, November 06, 2013
It is hard to argue with that, particularly as the attitude of Adams contrasts so much with that of Martin McGuinness who has described the IRA’s secret killing and burying of victims as “cruel and unjustified”. McGuinness has never denied being in the IRA. Adams has done so for 30 years.

Who is the more believable?
That was on BBC4 last night - watched some of it. Even in teh face of documented photographic evidence he was still denying it....says a lot really...

+ his brother is a nonce...shameful
__________________
Computek Blog Ireland
"There Justified and Ancient and they drive an Ice Cream Van"
☲ ☴ ☵ ☷
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:47 PM
westieboyo westieboyo is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 6,379
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smeggle View Post
That was on BBC4 last night - watched some of it. Even in teh face of documented photographic evidence he was still denying it....says a lot really...

+ his brother is a nonce...shameful
Gerry Adams and $inn Féin don't do shame.
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:50 PM
mawhosmeda mawhosmeda is offline
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 4,540
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by westieboyo View Post
Gerry Adams and $inn Féin don't do shame.
Gerrys days as Sinn Fein's Supremo are numbered--even Sinn Fein are not that stupid.
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 06-11-2013, 12:59 PM
westieboyo westieboyo is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 6,379
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mawhosmeda View Post
Gerrys days as Sinn Fein's Supremo are numbered--even Sinn Fein are not that stupid.
Oh I don't know. They still allow Muintir to be their official spokesman on the PRoC.
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 06-11-2013, 04:18 PM
jimmym jimmym is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 16,366
Default

as a sense of balance maybe people should read the case of roseanne mallon
a pensioner who was shot dead by loyalists in dungannon in 1994,
a british surveillance camera in the area vanished at the time of the murder,
events like this are conveniently forgotten by people,
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 06-11-2013, 04:37 PM
Bin Hex 12 Bin Hex 12 is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 7,361
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmym View Post
as a sense of balance maybe people should read the case of roseanne mallon
a pensioner who was shot dead by loyalists in dungannon in 1994,
a british surveillance camera in the area vanished at the time of the murder,
events like this are conveniently forgotten by people,
An Army surveillance camera was found close to the scene of the murder.

The Army was conducting a surveillance operation on a nearby house owned by her nephew.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 06-11-2013, 04:44 PM
Muintir Muintir is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 7,052
Default

oseann Mallon inquest told Army tapes were wiped after UVF murder
Roseann Mallon Roseann Mallon was shot dead by the UVF in 1994
Continue reading the main story
Related Stories

Inquest opens into pensioner murder

Army surveillance tapes that could have recorded the paramilitary murder of a pensioner 20 years ago were wiped, an inquest into her death has been told.

Roseann Mallon, 76, was killed when loyalist gunmen opened fire on a house at Cullenrammer Road, Dungannon, County Tyrone, in May, 1994.

Months later, an Army surveillance camera was found close to the scene.

But a barrister representing her family told the inquest: "These tapes were wiped. Almost entirely."

According to the barrister, scraps of edited recordings were retained but the bulk of footage from the day of the shooting and the previous three weeks were destroyed.

Ms Mallon was shot multiple times in the attack, which was carried out by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF).

Her death was controversial because it later emerged the Army was conducting a surveillance operation on a nearby house owned by her nephew.
'Need to know'

Her inquest at Belfast's Laganside court complex also heard how the police officer leading the hunt for the UVF killers was not told about the covert Army operation that had been filming the Mallon house since April 1, 1994.

Kenneth McFarland, a former Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) detective chief inspector, said he only found out about the camera after being contacted by a solicitor two months after the attack.

Mr McFarland, who retired in 2002, said he had requested information from RUC Special Branch but was informed they had nothing that could assist his case.

He said: "Special Branch operated on a need to know basis. If they felt you did not need to know it, you didn't know it."

Claims of security force collusion were made after the unmanned camera was found concealed in a field overlooking the house and adjacent engineering workshop used by Ms Mallon's nephews Martin and Christopher.
'Frustrated'

It transmitted footage to soldiers in a nearby wood.

A number of people, including loyalist paramilitary Billy Wright, were arrested and questioned in the wake of the shooting but no one has ever been charged with Roseann Mallon's murder.

Mr McFarland said he had been frustrated by the lack of co-operation from Special Branch and had been keen to locate the camera.

"It was taken as read this was an undercover operation. From my point of view the important (thing) was to get my hands on the camera to see if it could assist me."

He later added: "I felt frustrated. I would have liked all the evidence at the time."

When asked by the Mallon family's barrister if it was "indefensible" that the recordings were never handed over, Mr McFarland replied: "I would have thought the best course of action would have been to provide my team with the tapes."


'Stashed guns'

Earlier, the court heard a claim that the RUC pressurised a 10-year-old boy into changing a police statement he made about having seen guns close to the murder scene on the day before Ms Mallon's killing.

The boy, Gareth Loughran, claimed at the time to have seen guns and army packs stashed in an old mill near the Mallons' houses.

Mr Loughran, now an adult, testified to the inquest that two RUC detectives visited his own family home on the day after the murder and questioned him about his claim.

"It seemed to me at the time they wanted me to say I hadn't seen anything," the witness told the Coroner's court.


Mr Loughran was a neighbour of Ms Mallon and a childhood friend of one of her relatives, Barry Rafferty.

He described how, as a 10-year-old boy, he had gone to the old mill with Barry Rafferty with the intention of building a hut.

Mr Loughran said when he opened a bolted shed door, he saw military-type rucksacks and about five or six guns leaning up against the wall.

The boys were then confronted by a man in camouflage-type clothing who told them to leave the area, the inquest wad told.
'Lied'

The children reported their discovery to their parents and were taken to their local police station the following day, Sunday, 8 May 1994, to make statements.

That night Ms Mallon was shot dead.

On 9 May 1994, two RUC detectives visited the Loughran family home and spent two hours interviewing Gareth about his statement.

He told the inquest: "They just kept repeating the question."

Later he added: "They went over and over it again until they made me doubt myself. They made me think I hadn't seen anything."

After being questioned by the two RUC men, the 10-year-old Mr Loughran then made a second statement in which he said he had lied about what he had seen at the mill.

His mother, Sheila Loughran, told the inquest she was unaware the police officers who visited her home had been interrogating her son.
'Upset'

Mrs Loughran, a nurse, said neither she nor her husband had been present for the interview because she had thought the officers just wanted to clarify a few points.


She added: "Roseann had died. The dynamics had changed. Everybody was upset."

Mrs Loughran told the court she had accepted without question the authority of the officer who said that her son had lied.

"Twenty years on I wouldn't, but then I would," she said.

The inquest is scheduled to last for two weeks and is expected to hear from two Special Branch officers whose identity has not been made public.

A number of soldiers also due to give evidence have been granted anonymity despite objections from the Mallon family.

The case was among 29 controversial Troubles-related inquests awaiting a full hearing
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 06-11-2013, 07:44 PM
westieboyo westieboyo is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 6,379
Default

Gerry Adams' paedophile brother was due to be sentenced yesterday for raping and buggering his 4 year old daughter, whilst being a senior member of $inn Féin.

Gerry Adams was conveniently out of the country to ensure he wasn't available for comment.

Unfortunately for Gerry, the Judge put the sentencing back.

Poor old Gerry. What excuse will he have next time for not being in the country when his brother is due to be sentenced?

Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump










All times are GMT. The time now is 12:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.10
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
All forum comments are the sole responsibility and property of forum users. PeoplesRepublicOfCork.com and its sponsors disclaim all liability for content posted by users of the forum. PeoplesRepublicOfCork.com and its sponsors do not necessarily share the views expressed in this forum. Use the report post system to have comments considered for edit or deletion. All users are IP logged. Website hosted by Hostrocket USA.